STRATEGIC PLAN

2001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

September 2001


 

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN

 

I.   EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

August 2001 Update

 

In 2000-2001, the University Planning Council of Northern Arizona University reviewed and revised NAU’s current Strategic Plan consulting with a number of groups across campus including the Faculty Senate and the Council of Deans.  As a result of yearlong deliberations, the committee recommended a set of goals, strategies and performance measures to set strategic directions for the institution. 

 

Incoming NAU President, Owen Cargol, understands Northern Arizona University’s responsibility to provide the Board of Regents with an annual update of our Strategic Plan.  President Cargol supports the general thrusts of this plan, and submits it to the Board with the understanding that he will be engaging the University community in a wide spectrum of planning activities and discussions as NAU and he move forward together to provide higher education excellence and access for the citizens of Arizona.

 

The complete Strategic Plan 2010 is available at http://www4.nau.edu/pair/ -- University Planning.

 

A.  Crosswalk from ABOR Strategic Directions to NAU Strategic Plan Goals

 

ABOR Strategic Directions

NAU Strategic Plan Goals

  • To Improve Undergraduate Education
  • To Promote Learner-Centered Education

To Be a Premiere Undergraduate Residential Learning Community Emphasizing Superior Undergraduate Programs

  • To Strengthen Graduate Education

 

  • To Enhance Research and Impact Economic Development

To Be Recognized Regionally, Nationally, and Internationally for Selected Creative Endeavors, Research, and Graduate Programs Especially Those That Build From Our Base on the Colorado Plateau

  • To Improve Undergraduate Education
  • To Strengthen Graduate Education
  • To Assure Access to Public University Education for all Qualified Residents of Arizona

To Build on Our National Reputation for Excellence In The Preparation Of Teachers And In Applied and Professional Programming In Undergraduate And Graduate Areas That Meet the Needs at the Regional, State and National Levels

  • To Capitalize on New and Emerging Technologies to Improve Teaching, Learning, Research, and Service Outcomes

To Provide Regional and National Leadership in the Development, Use, and Assessment of Technologies to Enhance and Deliver Superior Educational Programs

  • To Assure Access to Public University Education for all Qualified Residents of Arizona
  • To Strengthen Relationships with Governmental, Educational, and Constituent Groups

To Foster a Culture of Diversity Visible in Academic Programming and in the Recruitment of Faculty, Staff, and Students

  • To Assure Access to Public University Education for all Qualified Residents of Arizona

 

  • To Strengthen Relationships with Governmental, Educational, and Constituent Groups

To Be the Nation’s Leading Non-Tribal University in Affording Educational Opportunities for Native American Students, In Providing Service and Applied Research To Native American Tribes, and In Advancing Research Concerning the History, Culture, and Contemporary Issues of Native American Peoples

  • To Improve Efficiency and Demonstrate Accountability
  • To Improve Undergraduate Education
  • To Strengthen Graduate Education

To Increase Private Support and Research Funding To Supplement State Funding and Tuition, In Order To Guarantee an Operating Budget That Supports Academic Excellence

 

 

B.  Highlights of Strategic Initiatives Accomplished in 2000-2001

 

ABOR Strategic Directions

 

NAU Accomplishments in 2000-2001

To Improve Undergraduate Education

·         The American Dental Association reports that in 2001, 100% of NAU senior dental hygiene students taking the written National Board Examination passed.

·         During the past year, 100% of NAU health promotion students taking the Certified Health Education Specialist (CHES) Examination passed it as compared to a national pass rate of 74%.

·         Four College of Engineering and Technology faculty members have won national awards for teaching excellence.

·         96 percent of the graduating seniors in 2000 rate their overall experience at NAU as excellent or good.

·         97 percent of NAU alumni would recommend NAU to someone looking for a college to attend today.

 

To Strengthen Graduate Education

·         The College of Engineering and Technology partnered with ASU and U of A to obtain Arizona Board of Regents approval to offer an Arizona Regents University (ARU) Tri-University Masters of Engineering Degree Program.

·         Typically 65-70% of new graduate students persist to obtain their degree.

·         Northern Arizona University will offer a new master of science in statistics beginning fall 2001 and has created a two-year professional master’s degree program in applied physics.

 

To Enhance Research And Impact Economic Development

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Enhance Research And Impact Economic Development

continued

 

·         The total amount of external federal and state grants awarded to NAU increased from $19.6 million in 1998 to $28.2 million in 2000.  As a result of this increase, the number of faculty who are either completely or partially paid from the external dollars generated from these awards had increased by 35% between 1998 and 2000.

·         The U.S. Congress approved $8.8 million for Northern Arizona University’s Ecological Restoration Institute to “oversee treatments designed to protect communities from the threat of catastrophic fire and reverse ecological degradation to ponderosa pine forests.”

·         The College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Ecosystems Science and Management received a grant for $3 million from the National Science Foundation to study riparian or streamside ecosystems.

·         The Arizona K-12 Center received $1.5 million from the U.S. Department of Education for a “Preparing Tomorrows Teacher to Use Technology Today” grant.

·         The College of Arts and Sciences was one of 14 colleges and universities nationwide selected to receive funding for the 2001 Beckman Scholars Program for undergraduate research.

 

To Assure Access to Public University Education for all Qualified Residents of Arizona

·         Currently about 25 percent of NAU’s students enroll at Statewide sites throughout Arizona.  This already significant commitment to statewide access will be augmented as Proposition 301 funds provide increased access and workforce development through e-learning and distributed learning initiatives.

·         The outreach program of the School of Performing Arts reaches more than 1000 students every summer through camps, workshops and concerts.

·         In 1999, NAU ranked first in the nation in the number of Native American students earning degrees.

 

To Capitalize on New and Emerging Technologies to Improve Teaching, Learning, Research and Service Outcomes

·         NAU offers 40+ degree programs off-campus, with 8 entirely at a distance.

·         The Center for Excellence in Education is involved in a pilot program to link nine IITV sites into a single mega cohort who will complete their student teaching in fall 2002.

·         The Cline Library is collaborating with faculty in designing and developing courses.  Librarians are creating web resource pages, providing electronic course readings and music listening examples, and providing access to any array of services and resources available 24 x 7, regardless of the student or faculty member’s location.

 

To Strengthen Relationships with Governmental, Educational and Constituent Groups

 

 

 

 

 

·         Yuma Regional Medical Center agreed to fund a nursing faculty position at NAU-Yuma.  The individual will work half time as a NAU-Yuma nursing faculty member and half time at the medical center identifying and implementing professional development programs.

·         The Center for Excellence in Education partnered with other Flagstaff organizations to manage two GEAR-UP grants to provide low-income junior high school students with counseling, mentoring and tutoring to help them earn college degrees.

·         The School of Fine Art maintains two professionally run art galleries, and the School of Performing Arts produces more than 300 concerts and productions a year.

·         The School of Forestry’s Ecological Restoration Program was chosen to receive one of this year’s Governor’s Pride Awards for its environmental leadership.

·         The College of Health Professions houses the nation’s only baccalaureate nursing program located on Native American lands (in Ganado on the Navajo Nation).

 

To Improve Efficiency and Demonstrate Accountability

 

 

Improve Efficiency

continued

·         The SOLAR project to install the enterprise software system Peoplesoft was initiated in July 2000, and is on-track to meet its timelines and success criteria.  Completed projects include “Academic Structure” and “Campus Community.”

·         Libraries at NAU, ASU and U of A participating in the consortia to license of electronic resources have realized a savings of over 30% in the past five years, as well as increased the overall access to electronic resources.

·         The Board of Regents approved Northern Arizona University’s Campus Master Plan in April.

 

To Promote Learner-Centered Education

·         Over 90% of undergraduate and graduate programs have developed plans to assess learning outcomes.

·         Contracts were signed for a new residence hall that features the apartment-style living requested by students.

·         NAU students participated in sophisticated experiential learning activities.  Recent examples include producing five hours of live election coverage for the presidential election, providing clinical exercise diagnosis and prescriptions, and exceeding the return of professional money managers in the Student Managed Investment Fund for the Northern Arizona University Foundation.

·         To support the development of learner-centered activities NAU sent one team of faculty and deans to the American Association on Higher Education  (AAHE) Conference and another team to the Council for Adult and Experiential Learning (CAEL) annual conference.

 


 

 

 

 

II.  MISSION STATEMENT

Northern Arizona University is a doctoral-intensive institution that has at its core undergraduate programs, significant research, and graduate programs to the doctoral level appropriate to its size and classification.  Northern Arizona University aspires to be a premiere undergraduate residential institution that provides its students with an innovative and challenging liberal arts and sciences core integrated with a comprehensive number of professional programs.  The learning environment at the Mountain Campus is unmatched for natural beauty and for student-centered programs and services.  Undergraduate programming prepares students for life in the twenty-first century by assuring individual development through small classes, close interaction with senior faculty, and sophisticated learning technologies more commonly found at the nation’s leading private universities.

 

Northern Arizona University also provides exceptional quality in a selected number of post-baccalaureate certificates, master’s and doctoral programs in its areas of greatest strength.  The University seeks to expand its post-baccalaureate programs as interdisciplinary fields expand and as the needs of economy demand increasing levels of educational preparation.  Intimately linked to its undergraduate and graduate missions, the university’s faculty, organized in departments, research centers and institutes, advances knowledge in traditional disciplines, in fields related to NAU’s unique environment on the Colorado plateau, and in response to the needs of the state and region for solutions to real world problems.

 

Finally, NAU is an integral part of the northern Arizona and Flagstaff communities.  It embraces its mission to serve rural Arizona, Native American peoples, and seeks a partnership in providing economic, cultural, and social opportunities for all citizens of the region. Consonant with its mission to serve the state’s rural counties, the university has innovative partnerships with rural community colleges, operates an education center in Yuma and IITV sites in twenty-six locations plus technology-based delivery into offices and homes.

 

 

III. THE PLANNING ENVIRONMENT

NAU continuously monitors its environment to stay abreast of issues and trends that will affect efforts to provide quality education and a premier residential experience.   Following are issues and trends that are expected to be important to higher education in the near future:

 

Financial Resources and the Economy

·        The State of Arizona FY2002-2003 budget includes a 5% increase in state employee pay, effective April 1, for both 2002 and 2003, with a minimum adjustment of $1,500 each year for full-time employees.  NAU also received a $4 million base appropriation to offset additional tuition retention for bonding approximately $63 million to restore buildings and infrastructure on the mountain campus.  Tuition revenues continue to show steady but moderate increases primarily resulting from rate increases approved by the Board.  The voters approved a 0.6% increase in the sales tax rate (Proposition 301) to fund a variety of education-related programs.  It is expected NAU will receive approximately $8 million in Proposition 301 funding to support new economy initiatives.  The State Operating Budget is expected to increase by 5.27% and the All Funds Operating Budget is expected to increase by 6.68%.

 

·         Nevertheless, funding for universities has dropped as a share of the general fund from 14.7 percent in FY92 to 12.3 percent in FY02. Source:  “Then and Now” JLBC, BH-12

 

·         Tuition to attend Northern Arizona University for resident undergraduates ($2,386 in 2001-2002) remains modest compared to tuition at peer institutions and similar institutions in the West/Southwest.

 

·         The differential in average family income by educational attainment of householder in 1998 was almost $40,000 between a high school graduate and a bachelor’s degree graduate, more than $50,000 between a high school graduate and the master’s degree graduate, and almost $70,000 between a high school graduate and an individual with a doctorate.  Source: Postsecondary Education Opportunity

 

·         Arizona At Risk, The Report of the Governor’s Task Force on Higher Education, December, 2000, states, “It is imperative that the state recognize the crucial role of higher education as a driver for Arizona’s New Economy.”  Taxpayer support of Proposition 301 and three key strategies, 1) raising the level of participation in higher education, 2) increasing research and business development, and 3) increasing capacity and productivity provide overall direction for developing Arizona’s knowledge-based “new economy” workforce.

 

·         Arizona is expected to emerge from the national economic slowdown in good shape and is still projecting growth of nearly 150,000 jobs over the next two years.  The Arizona Department of Economic Security, in its ’01-’02 employment forecast, continues to expect “Arizona will easily remain among the 10 fastest job-growing states in the nation.”

 

Implications for NAU

NAU’s Proposition 301 funding provides a means to respond to an increasing demand for continuing and professionally oriented education, as well as expanding our solid and growing presence in research.  Programs funded will focus on the following areas:

o        Environmental Research, Development and Education for the New Economy;

o        Biotechnology and Human Welfare: An Initiative to Benefit the Economy, Environment and Health of Arizona;

o        Access/Workforce Development: Education in the New Economy-Expansion of NAU’s Distributive Learning System;

o        E-Learning Initiative: Building a Campus Learning Environment for the New Economy; and

o        the Arizona Regent’s University 

 

Although Proposition 301 adds welcome funds to new initiatives, it does not address long-term budget stagnation, especially in NAU’s ability to offer competitive faculty and staff salaries.  Over the last ten years, state appropriations to universities have increased more slowly than other state priorities such as the Department of Corrections, K-12, the Judiciary, community colleges or the Department of Health Services.   This continues to be a grave concern given a NAU commitment of excellence in education and the workforce and economic development goals of the Governor’s Task Force.

 

Demographic Changes

·          Arizona’s population grew by more than 1.4 million or 40 percent since the 1990 census.  Maricopa County grew by almost 45 percent.  Counties north (Yavapai-56%, Mohave-66%) and west (Yuma-50%, La Paz, 42%) of Maricopa grew at rates among the highest in the state.  Coconino County grew by 20 percent. Source: State Data Center Newsletter, Spring 2001

 

·         The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) estimates that over the next decade, Arizona will see an increase of 28 percent in the number of students graduating from high school, with 11,300 more students graduating than in the year 2000.  Arizona high school graduates are expected to grow throughout the entire decade of 2000-2010.

 

·         The population in the state of Arizona continues to be more diverse.  The largest minority group in Arizona reports a Hispanic or Latino ethnic heritage (almost 1.3 million out of a total Arizona population of 5.1 million).  The 2000 census showed a Hispanic growth rate of 88 percent. Source: State Data Center Newsletter, Spring 2001

 

·         The president of the American Association for Higher Education (AAHE) writes that higher education needs to create environments where diverse students can succeed…and that too many institutions have not changed to meet that challenge.  Source:  AAHE Bulletin, June, 2001, p.8

 

Implications for NAU

NAU is well positioned to offer access to higher education throughout the state through its statewide sites and distance education programming, by offering courses and programs through the Arizona Regents University (ARU), and at its residential campus in Flagstaff.  NAU’s commitment to diversity and its learner-centered student services focus will be important factors that assist students to achieve learning goals and degrees.

 

Technology

·         The CEO Forum on Education and Technology states, “Students must be able to use technology’s tools to enhance learning; increase productivity; promote creativity; research topics online; proficiently use web-based tools, evaluate sources; develop problem solving strategies; and incorporate technology into their coursework.” Source:  Education Technology Must Be Included In Comprehensive Education Legislation, March 2001

 

·           “There is a good labor market for everybody, as long as you have some competency with technology.”  Source: Philip D. Gardner, Collegiate Employment Research Institute, Michigan State University, Chronicle of Higher Education, 6/25/99, p. A51

 

·         Sonoma State University, one of the first public universities in the country to require computer ownership, listed four major advantages of a mandatory computer ownership program:

ü      The growing amount and changing nature of knowledge. To access this flood of information we need to utilize information technology, and it needs to be available to our students whenever and wherever they need to use it.

ü      Changes in educational paradigms. Ensuring that all students have access to information technology resources can help to create a learning environment in which interaction, communication, engagement, and discovery can take place.

ü      Workplace demands. Information technology is no longer limited to certain "technical" professions.

ü      A need for equity. Without a commitment to universal access to information technology, we risk building a society of haves and have-nots among our students.

 

·          Increasingly college courses use electronic mail, course web pages and other forms of information technology to enrich classroom teaching.  Source: Kenneth Green.  The 1998 National Survey of Desktop Computing in Higher Education, 1998

 

·         According to a 1998-99 survey from the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), 78 percent of public four-year institutions in the U.S. in 1997-98, reported offering distance education courses and another 12 percent planned to do so in the next three years.

 

Implications for NAU

Inherent in Northern Arizona University’s Proposition 301 E-Learning initiative is a rethinking and restructuring of curriculum and research on the Mountain Campus to more adequately prepare learners for the New Economy.  These efforts will be directed and coordinated through a Center for Research, Development and Assessment of Learning in Electronic Environments.

 

Northern Arizona University intends to take the lead in creating an academic environment that will make it possible for students and faculty to take advantage of technological developments.  NAU will use strategies such as a phase in of a computer ownership requirement (first with freshmen), the development of technological literacy standards, and campus-wide efforts to support departments, programs, and faculty using computers in their class activities and assignments.

 

Physical Environment

·         The capital renewal and replacement of higher education facilities has been a growing problem for decades.  A 1989 major nation report, The Decaying American Campus: A Ticking Time Bomb, estimated the national renewal and replacement needs of colleges and universities at between $60 and $70 billion dollars.  Safety, improved ventilation and air quality, lighting, acoustics, and accommodations for persons with disabilities need attention, but also changes in teaching methods, equipment and a learner-centered approach creates the need to renew and expand lab facilities, upgrade classrooms, and provide new space and service configurations.

 

Implications for NAU

NAU received a new base appropriation for Mountain campus infrastructure of almost $4 million, which allow for the bonding of approximately $60 million in building renewal projects.  While these funds are very welcome, the elimination of building renewal funds from the 2002-2003 biennial budget was disheartening. Many of NAU’s buildings were built in the 1960’s and have not seen substantial maintenance or renovation since then.  A detailed building inventory taken in 1999 has revealed the need for over $100 million dollars to bring current facilities up to minimal safety and usability standards.   Moreover, as well as meeting safety and livability needs, NAU must redesign space to provide for learner-centered educational facilities.

 

Higher Education

·         Measuring Up 2000: The State-by-State Report Card for Higher Education grades all 50 states on how well they prepare their citizens to participate in an accessible and affordable system of higher education.  According to this public policy analysis, Arizona rates a D on K-12 preparation, a C on participation, a C on affordability, a C on completion of degrees, and a B on the benefits the state receives as a result of having a highly educated population.

 

·         Pascarella and Terenzini, well-known higher education researchers, believe “the quality of teaching, the extent and nature of integration with faculty and peers, the effectiveness of student affairs programming, the focus and intensity of academic experiences, and the overall level of student engagement” are important factors in providing a quality education.  Source:  Change, May/June 2001, p.20

 

·         The Arizona Board of Regents has requested that universities develop ways to ensure that the learner-centered education plan, Towards Promoting An Environment for Learner-Centered Education: A Proposal, February, 2000, is institutionalized at Arizona’s public universities.  As part of this effort, ABOR Policy 2-203 requires that Learning Outcomes and Plans for Assessment are required for all new programs. 

 

·         Patricia Cross writes that leading-edge efforts to improve teaching and learning goals include:

ü         Improving teaching by applying knowledge about cognition and learning, targeting particular groups of students, targeting particular faculty, and developing a “personal vision” of teaching,

ü         Redesigning courses to adapt to new technologies and implement new curricular or emphases, and

ü          Changing the learning environment of the institution by creating “learner-centered” colleges, developing a distinctive institutional mission focus, focusing on student learning outcomes, and instituting incentives and rewards for teaching.  Source: Change, July/August, 2001, p.32

 

Implications for NAU

NAU’s liberal studies program (general education), by paying sustained attention to essential skills—reading, writing, critical thinking, quantitative reasoning, and creative thought—will ensure that students reach levels of achievement that enable them to succeed regardless of their chosen career.

 

NAU is focusing on developing improved learner-centered student services and is developing a centralized advising and mentoring center, as well as establishing an area where students can conveniently access centralized university advising and other student services (tentatively referred to as a “gateway” to campus services).

 

NAU’s new faculty development program will assist faculty in achieving their full potential as teachers, scholars and productive members of the university community.  The goals of this program are to promote a scholarly community, to develop understanding and expertise in modern education trends and techniques, advance faculty research and development efforts, facilitate the development and implementation of improved methods for assessment of teaching and learning and to provide introduction to and technical training in the application of technology to higher education.

 

 

IV. Northern Arizona University Goals, Objectives, and Performance Measures

 

This section of the strategic plan provides information on the seven major goals of the NAU Strategic Plan 2010 and the related objectives and performance measures.

 

GOAL 1  To Be a Premiere Undergraduate Residential Learning Community Emphasizing Superior Undergraduate Programs

 

Northern Arizona University is achieving distinction as an undergraduate institution that offers many learner centered programs that engage faculty and students in collaborative pursuits.  Its distinction emerges from a strong liberal arts core integrated and combined with a comprehensive number of professional programs in areas such as business, communications, engineering, the allied health professions, education, and social services.  Its small classes, close interaction of professors with students, student services, and the residential learning community distinguishes this learning environment.  The undergraduate experience at the Mountain Campus provides opportunities usually only found in the nation’s private liberal arts colleges.  Specific objectives include:

 

Objectives

1:  To increase academic excellence in programs.

Related to System Directions/Goals I, IV, VI, VII, and VIII

           

Strategies

 

2:  To increase academic excellence by enhancing the quality of the residential living and learning environment.  

Related to System Directions/Goals I and VIII

 

 

Strategies

·        Plan for learner-centered education and improving access to instructional technology in mountain campus building renovations.

·        Renovate public spaces to facilitate a learner-centered environment.

·        Build housing on campus that allows for individual living facilities.

·        Continue to develop living and learning facilities in the residence halls.

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Enrollment in the Honors Program

 

540

 

618

 

650

 

 

650

 

650

Percentage of graduating seniors very satisfied or satisfied with academic advising in major

 

79%

 

74%

 

77%

 

79%

 

80%

Percentage of undergraduate academic programs with assessment plans that measure learning outcomes

 

 

91%

 

 

92%

 

 

93%

 

 

95%

 

 

97%

Percentage of undergraduate degree recipients in research-related or capstone experience

 

 

59%

 

 

 

64%

 

 

63%

 

 

65%

 

 

69%

Increase the mountain campus full-time freshmen one-year retention rate

 

71%

 

72%

 

73%

 

75%

 

77%

Increase the mountain campus full-time six-year graduation rate*

 

47%

1993 Freshmen

 

42%

1994 Freshmen

 

45%

1995 Freshmen

 

47%

1996 Freshmen

 

49%

1997 Freshmen

* Will not see the full effect of new programming on the graduation rate until FY 07.

 

 

Goal 2:  To Be Recognized Regionally, Nationally And Internationally For Selected Creative Endeavors, Research And Graduate Programs Especially Those That Build From Our Base On The  Colorado Plateau

 

NAU is committed to providing post-baccalaureate programs at the certificate, master’s and doctoral levels, which meet the ever-changing professional needs of Arizona citizens.  In addition, the university will continue to offer selected master’s and doctoral programs which provide advanced levels of study in traditional and interdisciplinary fields that reflect areas of greatest strength such as business, environmental sciences, biology, the social sciences, and humanities.  The university recognizes that teaching and research are mutually supportive activities, and has many active research centers that help bridge the gap between disciplines, organizations, and between academic education and applied problem solving (examples include The Ecological Restoration Institute, the Merriam Powell Center for Environmental Research, the Institute for Human Development, and many more).  Because NAU’s location on the Colorado Plateau is rich with diverse economic, physical, biological, cultural and historical diversity, major conceptual advances, in fields such as environmental science, biotechnology, cultural anthropology, are well within the university’s capability.   NAU is also committed to providing research for the resolution of economic, environmental, and social, health, and political problems throughout the state and region.  Proposition 301 funding for initiatives in Environmental Research and Biotechnology will considerably enhance NAU’s ability to become a center of knowledge-creation and application. 

 

Objectives

1:  Build an Infrastructure for graduate education.

Related to System Directions/Goals II,III, IV, and VI

           

Strategies

·        Increase the number of graduate assistantships and fellowships to support graduate programming and research.

·        Secure private endowments, legislative appropriations or reallocate resources for interdisciplinary programs in mission critical areas.

·        Facilitate the development of on- and off-campus post-baccalaureate courses, degrees, and certificates in technology-related, environmental and other areas to respond to changing societal, workplace, and economic demands of the New Economy.  

 

2:   Expand the university’s research capabilities and creative endeavors

Related to System Directions/Goals III,VI and VIII

 

Strategies

·        Maximize the opportunities provided by Proposition 301 initiatives to leverage increased funding of pure and applied research.

·        Facilitate the growth and development of self-funded applied research centers and institutes that respond to critical needs in the state and region.

·        Support faculty in their grant-writing efforts through release time, workshops and other assistance.

·        Encourage the faculty to examine and rewrite promotion and tenure standards to recognize interdisciplinary grant writing and research. 

·        Increase the visibility of creative activities undertaken by faculty in appropriate programs..

·        Review the university's earnings and indirect distribution policies to ensure they are in line with current regional, state and national trends.

·        Develop a program for undergraduate research experiences and scholarships and fellowships to support it.

·        Construct a research facility that accommodates several centers and institutes with common space for collaboration between fields and efficiencies in staffing and equipment.

 

3:   Enhance our Role as a Regional, State and National Center for Expertise in Selected Areas of Strength

Related to System Directions/Goals III, V, and VI

 

        Strategies

·        Encourage departments to host state, regional and national conferences, and facilitate efforts to design summer workshops, seminars, and programs that will draw other academics and professionals to campus.

·        Encourage NAU faculty to write articles and edit national and regional publications and journals relevant to NAU’s mission.

·        Use the NAU teleconferencing capabilities to enhance communication in professional and academic networks.

·        Continue to increase NAU’s visibility as a repository for important collections or archives that relate to its mission and areas of strength.

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase the number of statewide graduate students

 

5,972

Unduplicated FY

 

6,045

Unduplicated FY

 

6,025

 

6,050

 

6,100

Increase the number of on-campus graduate students

 

3,557

Unduplicated FY

 

3,430

Unduplicated FY

 

3,600

 

3,650

 

3,700

Increase the number of graduate degrees granted annually

 

1917

 

NA

 

2,000

 

2,050

 

2,070

Increase the dollars/waivers granted for graduate scholarships & fellowships

 

$7,679,314

 

 

$7,896,000

Estimated

 

$8,119,000

 

$8,349,000

 

$8,584,000

Maximize the federal, state, and private investments leveraged by Proposition 301 Funds

 

0

 

0

 

$7,600,000

 

$7,800,000

 

$8,000,000

Increase the amount of federal, state grant and contract dollars (revenues +  carry-forward balances)

 

$35,527,800

 

$36,827,100

 

$47,901,000

 

$49,338,000

 

$50,818,000

 

Goal 3:  To Build On Our National Reputation For Excellence In The Preparation Of Teachers And In Applied And Professional Programming In Undergraduate And Graduate Areas That  Meet The Needs At The Regional, State, And National Levels

 

The preparation of teachers is a core professional program of Northern Arizona University.  Excellence in teacher preparation is not only the responsibility of the Center for Excellence in Education, but is a university-wide responsibility that joins core disciplines with education faculty.  Moreover, it depends on joint efforts with partners from the K-12 sector, community colleges, and the state’s economic and political leadership.  Northern Arizona University also intends to enhance excellence and access in baccalaureate and graduate programs in a comprehensive list of areas that includes the allied health professions, business, and information technology, engineering, criminal justice, public administration, social work, hotel/restaurant management, planning, and forestry. NAU’s has a commitment to integrate liberal arts content and skills with professional preparation at the undergraduate level, and intends to provide post-baccalaureate programs in existing and new fields as the demands of the disciplines, the economy, and society change.       

 

Objectives

1.  Enhance Access  and Quality in  Teacher Preparation Programs

Related to System Directions/Goals I,II,IV, VI and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Use Proposition 301 funds to offer alternative routes to teacher certification.

·        Provide programming to increase the number of students graduating in K-12 mathematics and science.

·        Recruit excellent students into teaching careers through innovative financial aid and scholarship programs. 

·        Provide in-service programs for teachers, state and local leaders, principals and superintendents to enhance educational leadership skills throughout Arizona.

 

2.  Enhance Access and Develop New Programs That Reflect the Changing Demands in the Workplace

Related to System Directions/Goals I,II, III, VI and VIII

 

Strategies

·        Use Proposition 301 funds to offer increased access to critically needed  professional programs in health care and business.

·        Explore new partnerships with business and social agencies that further integrates cooperative learning and professional internships and experience with degree requirements.

·        Explore certificate, master’s and doctoral programs in professional areas that meet learner and workforce needs of the region, state and nation.

·        Establish joint faculty appointments between the university and practitioners in a variety of non-academic settings, which allow the development of synergies for programming and research that sustain partnerships with the larger society.  

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase the number of students graduating from teacher preparation programs

 

631

 

NA

 

650

 

670

 

 

690

Increase the number of students completing alternative certification

 

5

 

5

 

20

 

40

 

60

Increase the number of students graduating in

7-12 mathematics and science

 

149

 

NA

 

155

 

175

 

190

Increase the number of post-baccalaureate certificate programs

 

4

 

4

 

10

 

12

 

15

 

 

Goal 4:  To Provide Regional And National Leadership In The Development, Use And Assessment Of Technologies To Enhance And Deliver Superior Educational Programs

 

“Taking the campus to the students” has been a hallmark of NAU’s mission. NAU has redefined the traditional campus by providing access throughout the state in more than 110 locations, and through IITV two-way video, satellite television, and technology-based courses, delivered to a student’s home, or place of business. Simultaneously, faculty have utilized the technology-based and IITV on-campus delivery to enrich existing courses, to develop new learning opportunities in and outside the classroom, and to facilitate student and faculty research within the discipline.  University faculty are committed to the use and development of new technologies but remain committed to mixed delivery systems that combine technology with personal interaction in seminars, discussion groups, residency on the Mountain Campus, and video-conferencing.  Not only does NAU foresee a continuation and expansion of technology enhanced and delivered education, but it is NAU’s goal to push the boundaries of the use of technology even further in the development of new courses and degree programs to become an international leader in the use of technology and in the delivery of programs. NAU also will expand primary research on the use and assessment of technology enhanced and delivered education, and the use of technology to facilitate a learner-centered environment both at the Mountain Campus and throughout the service region   NAU’s Workforce Development and E-Learning initiatives will use Proposition 301 funding to help achieve this goal.

 

Objectives

1.  Build Program/Course Support for Mountain Campus, Statewide and National Delivery

Related to System Directions/Goals I, II, III, IV,V, VI, VII and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Expand access for Arizona citizens by offering an increased number of courses, certificates and degree programs to the rural areas of the state and by delivering selected courses, certificates and degree programs in the urban areas of the state.

·        Develop certificate and graduate programs to meet the needs of undergraduates, graduate students and professionals desiring advanced professional training using technology-enhanced delivery systems.

·        Identify markets and deliver courses in the workplace for businesses, government agencies, schools and non-profit organizations at the regional, state and national level.

·        Expand the number of technology-delivered and technology-enhanced courses from every academic discipline and redesign traditional campus courses that can be improved and delivered more efficiently using technology.

·        Establish the Center for Research, Development, and the Assessment of Learning in Electronic Environments to create the capacity to assess learner-centered outcomes in non-traditional delivery settings.

 

 

2. Ensure Faculty Expertise and Institutional Support for Technology

Related to System Directions/Goals V, VII, and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Expand the university’s capacity to support instructors in the development and offering of technology-enhanced courses

·        Centralize support for instructional technology.

·        Encourage colleges and departments to examine promotion and tenure standards to recognize the innovative work and pedagogical strategies involved in enhancing traditional courses and developing new courses in technology-based environments.

·        Encourage the use of technology in teaching as a qualification for new faculty hires.

 

3.  Provide Institutional Support for Technology to Ensure Student Technological Expertise

Related to System Directions/Goals I,II,V, and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Use 301 funds to initiate programs to enhance the technological literacy of NAU students.

·        Foster student learning through new technologies by requiring all first-year students to own or lease a computer.

·        Establish university graduation requirements within the major and degree program to assure student abilities to enter a chosen field with the necessary knowledge and skills in technology.

·        Ensure that campus technical infrastructure keeps pace with the expanded use of technology in academic pursuits.

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase the number of technology (web)-based sections.

 

407*

* Change in Monitoring/Definition Process  in Spring 2000

 

271*

* Change in Monitoring/Definition Process  in Spring 2000

 

300

 

320

 

350

Increase in the number of students enrolled in technology (web)-based instructional courses and programs

 

 

5,531

 

 

       5,601

 

 

5,700

 

 

5,800

 

 

5,900

Percent of seniors reporting that the academic environment integrates technology in the learning process

 

Not Available

New Survey in 02

 

Not Available

New Survey in 02

 

50%

 

60%

 

70%

Percent of seniors reporting that their education at NAU helped develop their ability to use computing and information technology

 

 

Not Available

New Survey in 02

 

 

Not Available

New Survey in 02

 

 

70%

 

 

80%

 

 

85%

 

 

 

 

 Goal 5  To Foster a Culture of Diversity Visible in Academic Programming and in the Recruitment of Faculty, Staff and Students

 

NAU will foster a culture in which the value of diversity is integrated in all activities of the University including academic programming, student life, and recruitment and retention of students, faculty and staff   Exposure to a diversity of ideas and to new ways of thinking is part of the core of the university experience.  But the world of ideas is far from the only way in which diversity manifests itself in the society in which we live.  Being an educated citizen today means exposure not only to a diversity of students and faculty in terms of age and gender but also to a diversity of cultures, lifestyles, and values.  For NAU, diversity means expanding its minority populations beyond Native American students to encompass a rich array of programming for other ethnic groups.  Recruitment and programming for Hispanic students must represent a priority since this group now represents an increasing percentage of the student population. At the same time, the university must offer additional programming in for historically under-represented ethnic populations. The university must reflect the global environment that students will live and compete in, and thus the additional enrollment of international students and programming are key goals for the next decade.  Diversity must become a continuing theme in the hiring of faculty and staff, and must be reflected in general education courses and in offerings in majors and professional programs, as well as within the ongoing research and service activities of the university. 

 

Objectives

1.  Achieve Academic Excellence Through Increased Diversity Among Students and Employees

Related to System Directions/Goals IV, VI, and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Increase the representation of diverse groups among students, faculty and staff.

·        Increase the number of international students.

·        Increase the number of fellowships and scholarships available to recruit and retain ethnic and gender minorities, as well as international undergraduate and graduate students.

·        Promote retention of diverse groups by fostering a climate that is hospitable to discussion and resolution of issues.

 

2.      Enhance Academic Excellence through Increased Attention to Curriculum Development and Research on Diversity Issues

Related to System Directions/Goals I, II, and VIII

 

 Strategies

·        Engage faculty, administrators, and students in a formal process to review and integrate diversity issues into current curricular offerings.

·        Increase the number of NAU students taking at least two courses emphasizing diversity in their undergraduate programs.

·        Re-evaluate and strengthen the role of diversity in the Liberal Studies program.

·        Support a provost lecture series on issues related to diversity themes to highlight the university’s commitment each year and to attract campus attention to this theme. 

·        Encourage faculty research into diversity issues.

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase the number of historically under-represented ethnic students

 

4,882

Unduplicated FY

 

5,092

Unduplicated FY

 

5,110

 

5,130

 

5,150

Increase the number of International students

 

370

Unduplicated FY

 

376

Unduplicated FY

 

375

 

450

 

 

600

 

Increase the number of ethnically diverse faculty and appointed staff

 

121

 

 

139

 

145

 

152

 

160

Increase the amount of support (fellowships, scholarships, & waivers) awarded to ethnic and minority students

 

 

$4,931,823

 

 

$5,071.326

Estimated

 

 

$5,215,000

 

 

$5,363,000

 

 

$5,515,000

Increase the one-year retention rates of full-time ethnic minority students.

 

68%

 

69%

 

70%

 

72%

 

75%

Increase the six-year graduation rates of full-time ethnic minority students.*

 

36%

1993 Freshmen

 

27%

1994 Freshmen

 

36%

1995 Freshmen

 

38%

1996 Freshmen

 

40%

1997 Freshmen

* Will not see the full effect of new programming on the graduation rate until FY 07.

 

 

 Goal 6  To Be The Nation’s Leading Non-Tribal University In Affording Educational Opportunities For Native American Students, In Providing Service And Applied Research To Native American Tribes, And In Advancing Research Concerning The History, Culture, And Contemporary Issues Of Native American Peoples

 

Northern Arizona University's location on the Colorado Plateau ties the institution to the history and culture of the region.  More than twenty tribal entities, among them the nation's largest, the Navajo Nation, exist within Arizona’s boundaries and give the university a special mission for education, research, and service for Native Americans.  NAU's responsibility for providing education to rural Arizona also makes it a logical partner in maximizing educational opportunities for Native American students through on-site delivery and IITV.  The university’s commitment to Native American communities makes NAU a powerful partner in developing the workforce on reservation land.  Currently, NAU is one of the top five institutions in the United States for promoting education and research to an increasing number of Native American students.  Most recently, NAU graduated the highest number of Native American students (bachelors, master’s and doctorates) of any four-year university across the country.  A continuing goal of NAU is to become this country’s most important university in Native American education and enrollment. 

 

Objectives

1.  Expand and Develop Native American Educational Opportunity

Related to System Directions/Goals I, II, IV, V,VI, and VIII

 

       Strategies

·        Increase retention of Native American students.

·        Increase student enrollment in the American Indigenous Studies (AIS) program and courses.

·        Expand access to Native American culture and issues by developing AIS courses in the liberal studies program.

·        Promote more cultural awareness among faculty and students that increases knowledge of the university’s special role with Native American populations. Encourage the integration of concepts and issues central to Native American studies into curricular offerings. 

·        Recruit Native American faculty members in disciplines throughout the university.

·        Establish additional programming throughout Arizona to meet the needs of Native American populations.

 

2.   Enhance Research and Service to Native American populations

Related to System Directions/Goals III and VI

 

       Strategies

·        Increase extramural funding for support of research and other scholarly endeavors by Native American faculty and students.

·        Establish visiting professorships for Native American scholars.

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase one-year  retention rates of Native American students

 

63%

 

67%

 

67%

 

69%

 

70%

Increase the number of Native American students

 

1,878

Unduplicated FY

 

2,013

Unduplicated FY

 

1,900

 

1,950

 

2,000

Increase enrollment in Applied Indigenous Studies program and supporting courses.

 

371

 

664

 

700

 

725

 

750

Increase the total number of regular appointed Native American faculty and staff   

 

33

 

41

 

45

 

47

 

50

 

 

Goal 7 To Increase Private Support And Research Funding To Supplement State Funding And Tuition, In Order To Guarantee An Operating Budget That Supports Academic Excellence

 

The unlikelihood of major increases in state appropriations for higher education in the near future, as well as a reluctance to increase tuition demands a commitment of the university's energies to wisely use existing resources and to develop self-help activities, which lessens the university’s dependence on traditional sources of operating funds.  Only through a commitment to resource management by all faculty and staff will the university expand the number and quality of its education and research efforts in the years ahead.  A resource plan should be composed of several elements.  First, NAU must shepherd existing resources and tie yearly budgeting more clearly to priorities at the university and unit levels.  The university must also unify its many resources behind the goals of the Strategic Plan and annually demonstrate to the campus, the Arizona Board of Regents, and the public that resources support institutional priorities. NAU must also continue our development efforts to support existing programs, provide specialized resources, and expand the university-wide endowment.  Finally, the university should develop additional partnerships with corporations, social service agencies, school districts, and educational consortia to offer programs throughout the state and nation at tuition levels reflective of program cost and market demand.

 

Objectives

1.   Improve Financial Stability through Internal Priorities

Related to System Directions/Goals III, IV, and VI

 

       Strategies

·        The preparation of annual budgets at the department, college and division level must be tied directly to university priorities.

·        Increase enrollments to enhance revenue and fully utilize facilities and capacities.

·        Increase percentage of non-resident students at NAU to balance revenue and enhance the academic and multicultural environment.

·        Continue to increase extramural funding through pure and applied research grants building support for both faculty and students.

·        Continue pro-active advancement and development activities.

 

2.   Engage in New Activities and Programs Leading to Financial Stability

Related to System Directions/Goals VII

 

       Strategies

·        Develop a new initiatives fund of $500,000 to foster entrepreneurial programs and activities by faculty and staff on a competitive basis.

·        Develop new master’s and certificate programs on a self-funded model that allows revenue sharing to academic units.

 

 

 

 

Performance measures

 

Performance Measure

FY00 Actual

FY01 Actual

FY02 Proj

FY03 Proj

FY04 Proj

Increase the enrollment of Arizona freshman and transfer students

 

3,990

 

4,218

 

4,292

 

4,317

 

4,320

Increase the percentage of out-of-state and international students.

 

Out of state 15 %

International 1%

 

Out of state 14%

International 2%

 

15%

2%

 

15%

2%

 

16%

3%

Increase extramural funding from foundations and other private sources. 

 

 

$30.1 Million

 

 

~$22.8 Million

 

 

$27.8 Million

 

 

$32.8 Million

 

 

$37.8 Million

Increase the assets of the NAU Foundation.

 

$40 Million

 

$35 Million

 

$40 Million

 

$45 Million

 

$50 Million