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AQCP Problem-Based Learning

Problem-Based Learning Resources:

***As a convenience for viewers, EEOP provides the following links. The content of the links is not maintained by ITEP or EEOP. EEOP maintains no responsibility for the information on the following link sites.***

			  
			  

Problem-Based Learning Links:  

“Solving Authentic Science Problems” Uyeda, S., J. Madden, L.A. Brigham, J.A. Luft, and J. Washburne. 2002. The Science Teacher, v. 69 no. 1. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association.
This article describes the PBL process in simplified detail, outlines the benefits of PBL, describes how teachers can develop a problem for investigation, and presents an example of using PBL with minority students on a water project in Tucson, Arizona. www.nsta.org/main/news/stories/science_teacher.php?news_story_ID=46338

The Hong Kong Centre for Problem-Based Learning
Promotes and supports the development of PBL in all areas of education in Hong Kong and is the regional centre for the Asia-Pacific Problem-Based Learning Association. Primary focus is on higher education applications of PBL. www.hku.hk/pblhk/

The University of Delaware Problem-Based Learning
Provides links to other PBL sites, sample PBL problems, and a clearinghouse; primary focus is on applications in undergraduate education. www.udel.edu/pbl/

Universiteit Maastricht's PBL
Web site collates multiple resources from the Netherlands and internationally to assist faculty members in the implementation of PBL, primarily at the undergraduate level. www.unimaas.nl/pbl/

The Samford University Problem-Based Learning Initiative
Does research into the efficacy of PBL in undergraduate and professional education. The web site serves as a clearinghouse about PBL. www.samford.edu/pbl/pbl_main.html

McMaster University's Medical School
(Ontario, Canada) pioneered problem-based learning and remains a world class leader in PBL. Links are provided to other university web sites, primarily in medical education. http://socserv2.socsci.mcmaster.ca/soc/beehive/pbl.htm

Problem-based Learning
Especially in the context of large classes. Donald R. Woods' 1996 book about using PBL at the university level is published on the web, with multiple resources and links for information. http://chemeng.mcmaster.ca/pbl/pbl.htm

Center for the Advancement and Renewal of Learning and Teaching in Mathematics, Science, and Technology
Provides many links to Illinois standards, internet resources, and internet-based learning. www.imsa.edu/center/

The University of Manchester
(England) Department of English and American Studies is beginning using PBL to teach literary studies at the undergraduate level. More information about how this is being implemented is available on the web site. www.art.man.ac.uk/english/PROJECTS/pbl.htm

What is Problem-Based Learning? The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA) describes problem-based learning. IMSA is positioned as a leader in PBL with its national/international reputation as a provider of PBL training at the K-12 levels and beyond. IMSA's unique niche is extended professional development in a deeply grounded research-based PBL model. The IMSA's institutes provide a practical framework to enable classroom teachers to implement these theoretical beliefs. www.imsa.edu/center/pbl/intro.html

Center for Problem-Based Learning
The Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy's Center for Problem-Based Learning (CPBL) was established to engage in PBL research, information exchange, teacher training, and curriculum development in K-16 educational settings. www.imsa.edu/team/cpbl/center.html

Edutopia Innovative Classrooms - The George Lucas Learning Foundation
Follow the "Project-Based Learning" link at the bottom of this page for additional information. www.glef.org/classrooms.html

					

			  
			  

Problem-Based Learning Bibliography:  

Delisle, R. 1997. How to Use Problem-Based Learning in the Classroom. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (ISBN 0-87120-291-3)
Robert Delisle details the PBL process, the teacher's role in problem-based learning, and important background information about the history of PBL. The book describes a variety of PBL lessons, including problems, a chart for organizing student research, and information about assessment.

Glasgow, N.A. 1997. New curriculum for new times: A guide to student-centered, problem-based learning. Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press. (ISBN 0-8039-6499-4)
Neal Glasgow provides clear examples that show how to develop and assess your school's problem-based curriculum. He also details how to involve mentors from the community to help manage student projects across a wide range of subjects.

Lambros, A. 2002. Problem-based learning in K - 8 classrooms: A Teacher's Guide to Implementation. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, Inc. (ISBN 0-7619-4534-2)
This book illustrates how PBL can enliven curriculum and lesson planning by encouraging students to play a more central role in their own learning process. It provides a straightforward framework for efficiently and effectively teaching problem-solving skills, tapping children's interests and previous knowledge, and making the curriculum relevant to students' worlds of meaning. Special features include comprehensive definition of PBL and its benefits, PBL planning matrixes and sample lessons, PBL instructional materials for easy integration into the classroom, and detailed PBL problem scenarios specific to each grade level, with examples of how student groups worked together to solve them.

Levin, B. B. (ed.) 2001. Energizing teacher education and professional development with problem-based learning. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (ISBN 0-87120-508-4)
Editor Barbara Levin and the book's contributing authors believe that if teachers are to use PBL effectively with their K-12 students, they need to personally experience PBL themselves. Levin provides field-tested examples of how teacher educators have used PBL in many professional development settings. The final chapter offers answers to frequently asked questions about using PBL with teachers.

Stepien, W. J., P. R. Senn, and W. C. Stepien. 2000. The Internet and Problem-Based Learning. Tucson, Arizona: Zephyr Press. (ISBN 1-56976-108-6)
This book provides clear guidelines for using the Internet to teach research and thinking skill through a problem-based learning approach. The Internet is a wonderful and necessary tool, but using it to support your class can present a challenge. Eight compelling problem units, spanning subjects from math to social studies to language arts, take you and your students into the world of online information. The authors also show you how to create your own problem-based units. The Internet and Problem-Based Learning will help guide you and your students to a new level of online learning.

Torp, L. and S. Sage. 2002. Problems as Possibilities: Problem-Based Learning for K-16 Education. Alexandria, Virginia: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. (ISBN 0-87120-574-2)
In this book, Torp and Sage offer opportunities to learn about PBL from the perspectives of the teachers, students, parents, administrators, and curriculum developers. Readers gain a holistic sense of the problem-solving process through actual examples from PBL units at elementary, middle, high school, and university levels.

Uyeda, S., J. Madden, L.A. Brigham, J.A. Luft, and J. Washburne. 2002. "Solving Authentic Science Problems." The Science Teacher, v. 69 no. 1. Arlington, VA: National Science Teachers Association.
This article describes the PBL process in simplified detail, outlines the benefits of PBL, describes how teachers can develop a problem for investigation, and presents an example of using PBL with minority students on a water project in Tucson, Arizona.

					

			  
			  

Problem-Based Learning Support Materials:  

PBL: 3 Classrooms in Action This video captures the experiences of three very different classrooms engaged in problem-based learning. It is a clear testament to PBL's power to transform learning and engage both the student and teacher. The video is approximately 30 minutes long -- about 10 minutes for a middle school (grades 5 and 8) recycling unit, about 10 minutes for a high school English unit, and about 10 minutes on an elementary (grades 5/6) special education classroom unit. This video is a must see for parents, teachers, administrators, board members, staff developers, and curriculum coordinators! Available from Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy (IMSA), Center for Problem-Based Learning.

PBL: Ahead of the Pack This video highlights the benefits of PBL through the experience of students in a field-based Ecology course at IMSA. (15 minutes) www.imsa.edu/center/cpbl/center/products.html

The Flow of a PBL Experience: Learning from the Inside Out This video follows the PBL immersion experience of participants at the 1995 Harris Institute. Available from IMSA (30 minutes) www.imsa.edu/center/cpbl/center/products.html

The Problem Log is the newsletter of the Problem-Based Learning Network. Published three times a year, The Problem Log allows PBL practitioners from around the world to share their experiences and successes with problem-based learning. Back issues of The Problem Log are available on-line in PDF format.

ASCD's Problem-Based Learning Network is a network of educators from varied contexts and levels of education united by a common interest in problem-based learning. They value PBL as a natural organizing center for curriculum coupled with an instructional strategy. The goals are to maintain and support an interpersonal network among educators interested in problem-based learning to enable dialogue and the sharing of information, methods, and materials; builds educators' understanding of problem-based learning from the multiple perspectives of learner, coach, and problem designer; and enhances educators' existing problem-based learning knowledge bases and skill levels with coaching behaviors through dialogue and exchange of ideas. To join, contact:

Debra Gerdes
Leader
The Center @ IMSA
1500 West Sullivan Road
Aurora, IL 60506-1000
TEL (630) 907-5956
FAX (630) 907-5946
EMAIL: dgerdes@imsa.edu

Problem-Based Learning Across the Curriculum In this Presentation Digest audiotape session, Bill Stepien discusses how an innovative new approach called problem-based learning encourages students to think critically about information they discover and how to use their knowledge to construct ethical solutions to problems. Through demonstrations and experiential training designs you'll learn how problem-based learning encourages students at all ability levels to explore and apply specific knowledge. Problems are examined for specific disciplines and interdisciplinary settings. You will also examine outcomes and ways of authentically assessing those outcomes and discover the teacher's role as a coach. Available from ASCD's on-line store (Stock Number: 297182S25)

Problem-Based Learning Video Series shows how teachers can use open-ended problems to enhance learning in any subject. Two videos and a Facilitator's Guide introduce your school to the principles of problem-based learning and show the steps to designing problem-based units. Tape 1, Using Problems to Learn, takes you to classrooms where teachers use problem-based learning (25 minutes). In Tape 2, Designing Problems for Learning, teachers demonstrate how to design problem-based learning (40 minutes). Includes a 121-page Facilitator's Guide written by William J. Stepien. Available from ASCD's on-line store (Stock Number: 497172S25)

Problem-Based Learning Across the Curriculum Professional Inquiry Kit Use of this 1997 kit in smaller groups offers participants the opportunity to learn and apply new ideas on problem-based learning and gives teachers a thorough understanding of how to use open-ended problems to enhance learning in any subject. The first folder and an introductory video in the eight-folder series provide teachers with a rationale for and clear instructions on forming a successful study group. The remaining folders are titled:

  • Introducing Problem-Based Learning
  • The Anatomy of Real-World Problem Solving
  • How Can Ill-Structured Problems Lead to Meaningful Learning?
  • Creating an Ill-Structured Problem to Fit Your Curriculum
  • Coaching the Self-Directed Learner
  • Assessing the Outcomes of Problem-Based Learning
  • Extending Your Learning

Authors William J. Stepien and Shelagh Gallagher help teachers and other colleagues develop a thorough understanding of how to use open-ended problems to enhance learning in any subject; learn how problem-based learning encourages students to explore and apply knowledge; examine problems for specific disciplines and interdisciplinary settings; understand student assessment methods and the teacher's role in the problem-solving process. Available from ASCD's on-line store (Stock Number: 997148S25)

					
					  
					  

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Last updated: May 26, 2005