Six tips for writing your self-appraisal

Classified staff self-appraisals are due to Human Resources and supervisors by Friday, Sept. 30. Having trouble getting started? Human Resources has some good advice.

  1. Make lists.
    To give yourself a jump-start, begin by brainstorming. Make lists of accomplishments, feedback (written or verbal) from customers or peers, goals you met or didn't meet, things you want to improve on, training you've attended and teams or committee work you've participated in during the performance period.
  2. Write in the first person, but use a professional tone.
    Since you're writing about yourself, use "I" - but remember that this is still part of your appraisal record. Avoid slang or language that is too casual. "I rocked on that assignment!" may not be the most professional approach. On the other hand, flowery language with extra words isn't necessary. Keep it clear and simple.
  3. Make sure your assessment of your work ties back to your essential job functions.
    When writing your appraisal, make sure that you talk about how you performed in each of your position's essential job functions. To make this easier, refer to last year's appraisal, or if you're in a new position, look at the position description used to hire you. This is a good way to note if there are new things you've added to your role over the year.
  4. Give specific examples.
    Always give examples of how you performed or met a goal - not just general phrases. For instance: "I responded to all calls within 24 hours" is better than just saying "My customer service was good."
  5. Be as objective as you can.
    As you assess your performance, don't overstate or understate how you've done. For example, review goals that were set and discuss how you met them. If there were some you didn't meet, talk about what you learned or what you'll do differently during the new appraisal year. Show your supervisor that you have the ability to critically review your own work.
  6. Check for spelling, grammar, tone and clarity.
    Before submitting your appraisal to your supervisor, re-read it to correct any mistakes or clear up any confusing sentences. Also review whether you might need to add or clarify an example.

In general, the self-appraisal is a tool to help your supervisor write your final appraisal and to create the opportunity for an open discussion about success in your role.

For more information—including some sample self-appraisals—and the Classified Staff Self-Appraisal form, click here.