Tribal Climate Change Webinars:

Upcoming Webinars:

Suggestions and Feedback:
We want to hear from you! Please send ideas and suggestions for future topics/presenters. We’d also like to hear feedback about a particular webinar you participated in. Thank You!
Contact: Susan.Wotkyns@nau.edu; 928/523-1488

Climate Change Impacts, Traditional Knowledge, and Communication
This series of four webinars will discuss impacts of climate change on tribal water resources and traditional foods, the role of traditional knowledge in climate change initiatives, and communicating about climate change. The webinars are being offered by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) at Northern Arizona University with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Traditional Foods
June 5, 2014, 10:00-11:15 a.m. PDT


Climate change is impacting a whole host of tribal natural resources, including traditional foods. Learn about some of the strategies that tribes are utilizing to protect these precious resources. During this webinar, presenters will discuss climate impacts on traditional foods as well as adaptation techniques that have been adopted.
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video (the audio does not begin until 1:35 into video).

Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Tribal Water Resources
June 9, 2014, 10:00-11:15 a.m. PDT


This talk will provide an overview of climate change impacts on tribal water resources and the subsequent cascading effects on the livelihoods and cultures of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIAN). The presenters will first give a brief description of some climate, hydrologic, and ecosystem changes that are occurring or may occur. They will then describe some tribe-specific vulnerability and adaptive capacity factors that interact with climate changes to create or lessen impacts. These include socioeconomic, political, infrastructural, environmental, spiritual and cultural factors. Next we’ll describe five broad impacts categories that are being experienced by many AIAN and provide examples of impacts. We’ll finish off with examples of some solutions that tribes and tribal organizations around the country are implementing to increase climate change resilience.
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar: The Role of Traditional Knowledges in Climate Change Initiatives
June 16, 2014, 10:00-11:15 a.m. PDT

The significance and role of traditional knowledges is being explored among indigenous groups, and within many regional and national climate change initiatives. This webinar will explore the ways in which indigenous traditional knowledges may inform understanding how climate change is impacting indigenous cultural resources and life ways, and help lead to culturally-relevant adaptation strategies. The webinar will also examine the critical need for indigenous peoples and non-indigenous entities to understand what may be at risk when traditional knowledges are shared in non-indigenous forums, and what is needed to ensure that traditional knowledges are only shared with the Free, Prior and Informed Consent of indigenous governments and knowledge holders. Recognizing and obtaining FPIC can help bolster successful collaboration between indigenous and non-indigenous partners through equitable relationships, reduced disputes through mutual understanding of roles and responsibilities and lead to culturally appropriate adaptation strategies. The webinar will also share the experiences of the Yurok Tribe in utilizing traditional ecological knowledge to inform climate change priorities.
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar: Communicating about Climate Change – From Impacts to Solutions
June 23, 2014, 11:00 a.m.-12:15 p.m. PDT


Americans are waking up to the reality of extreme weather events and are beginning to connect the dots to climate disruption. Effectively engaging the public as partners in addressing the challenge requires emphasizing local, current and personally relevant impacts and bridging to solutions. Join environmental communications expert Cara Pike and Executive Director of Climate Access, for a discussion of the latest trends in public opinion polling, how to frame the climate conversation, and best practices in climate engagement.
  • Cara Pike, Executive Director of Climate Access
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.



Archive of Past Webinars:

Tribal Climate Change Webinar Series: Climate Change Impacts in the Pacific Northwest

This series of four webinars will discuss impacts of climate change in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States and implications of these impacts for tribes. The topic areas include marine issues, fisheries, forests, and invasive species and pests. The webinars are being offered by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) at Northern Arizona University with support from the USDA Forest Service Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNWRS), and in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Project at the University of Oregon, the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, and PNWRS. NOTE: Each webinar is limited to 100 participants.

Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Fisheries
April 24, 2014, 10:00 - 11:15 a.m. PDT
This webinar will provide highlights of current science about climate change impacts on fisheries in the Pacific Northwest, and a discussion of the implications of these impacts for tribes.

Presenters:
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar: Climate Change and Marine Issues
May 21, 2014, 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m. PDT
This webinar will provide highlights of current science about climate change and sea level rise, ocean acidification, and effects of rising water temperature on disease processes, and a discussion of the implications of these impacts for tribes.

Presenters:
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar: Climate Change and Invasive Species and Pests
May 27, 2:00 - 3:15 p.m. PDT
This webinar will provide highlights of current science about climate change and invasive species and pests in forest ecosystems and in freshwater ecosystems in the Pacific.

Presenters:
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar: Climate Change Impacts on Forests
June 4, 2014, 10:30 - 11:45 a.m. PDT
This webinar will provide highlights of current science about climate change impacts on forests in the Pacific Northwest, and a discussion of the implications of these impacts for tribes.

Presenters:
Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Additional information:
Most recent projections for climate and hydrology in the Northwest: http://pnwcirc.org/reports-and-publications
Northwest Climate Assessment Report (2013) posted here http://cses.washington.edu/cig/reports.shtml



Tuesday, April 29, 2014—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar

The DOI Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs)
Presented by John Mankowski, Coordinator, North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative

Protecting North America’s natural and cultural resources and landscapes is essential to sustaining our quality of life and our economy. The US Department of Interior established 22 Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs), which are public-private partnerships composed of states, tribes, federal agencies, non governmental organizations, universities and others. LCCs recognize that managing these natural and cultural resources and landscapes has become increasingly complex, transcends political and jurisdictional boundaries, and requires a more networked approach to conservation— holistic, collaborative, adaptive and grounded in science.

John Mankowski, Coordinator of the North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative, will provide an overview of the LCCs and how tribes can be involved in these partnerships. He will also discuss the goals of the North Pacific LCC, which includes parts of northern California, Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, and southeast Alaska. John Mankowski has been immersed in natural resource policy issues in the Pacific Northwest for the past 25 years. Prior to accepting this position he served for 5 years as Governor Gregoire’s principle advisor on natural resources and environmental issues. His portfolio included fish and wildlife conservation; agriculture production and conservation; forest policy on federal, state and private lands; outdoor recreation; renewable energy development; water quality; growth management; and tribal engagement. Before working for the Governor, John worked for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for 20 years in a biologist, manager, and environmental policy expert He also served in a variety of science and management positions for state and federal natural resource agencies in Idaho, Alaska and Arizona before moving to Washington.
    North Pacific LCC: http://www.northpacificlcc.org/
    National LCC Network: http://lccnetwork.org/

    Presentation:
    Click HERE for this presentation. [pdf]

Utilizing Yurok traditional ecological knowledge to inform climate change priorities
Presented by Joe Hostler, Environmental Protection Specialist with the Yurok Tribe Environmental Program

The Yurok Tribe located in NW California, has conducted a two phase study on Climate change impacts on Yurok Ancestral and Reservation Lands and resources, specific to impacts on wildlife and habitats that support culturally significant species. The first phase was the collection and documentation of TEK through community scoping and structured interviews that were recorded, transcribed, and entered into a GIS (mapped). The second phase consisted of analyzing the data collected in order to identify scientific information needs, data gaps and priority resources of concern specific to Climate change impacts that will be summarized in a final report to inform future funding, management and research efforts.

Joe Hostler, Environmental Protection Specialist, for the Yurok Tribe will discuss the process the Tribe used to document tribal traditional knowledge and what they learned during this project. He will describe this project from its beginnings as a partnership with the NPLCC, to how they designed the interview questions, and the process of documenting TEK while protecting confidentiality and intellectual property rights of the community and project participants. He will share lessons learned during this project that may be useful to others working to protect and preserve tribal traditional knowledge and wisdom.

Joe Hostler is an Environmental Protection Specialist with the Yurok Tribe Environmental Program. He is an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde and has a B.S. in Tribal Natural Resource Management Planning and Policy from Humboldt State University. He is an eager student of Traditional Ecological Knowledge and takes great pride in learning TEK from Tribal Elders and sharing this knowledge with Tribal Children.



ALASKA TRIBAL CLIMATE CHANGE WEBINAR
Tuesday, January 28, 2014, at 10-11:30 a.m. Alaska time:


Agenda:

Climate Change Impacts to First Foods
Presented by Cheryl Shippentower, Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Cheryl Shippentower is the Plant Ecologist at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Department of Natural Resources. She has worked for the Umatilla Tribe since 1995. Her primary responsibility is the protection, enhancement, and ecological restoration of "First Foods" and native plant resources that are critical to Tribal culture. Cheryl received a Bachelor’s Degree in Botany from Oregon State University and a restoration ecology certificate from the University of Idaho.

Presentation: First Foods Management

How do GAP funds contribute to developing a climate change program?
Presented by Michelle V. Davis, US EPA Tribal Coordinator. Michelle Davis is one of the Tribal Coordinators with the US EPA Region 10. She works with Alaskan Tribes in SouthEast and Prince William Sound and is a point of contact for Tribal Climate Change issues in Region 10 EPA. Before EPA, she was the Alaska Regional Coordinator for the Native American Fish and Wildlife Society. Michelle is an enrolled member of the Central Council of Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska and is from the Tlingit Eagle Moiety and Killer Whale House and lives in Wasilla, Alaska.

Relevant resources:
State of Alaska Wear Site: They were one of our first presenters.
http://dec.alaska.gov/eh/sw/wear.html

New state of Alaska publication "Understanding and Evaluating Erosion programs."
http://commerce.alaska.gov/dnn/Portals/4/pub/Understanding&EvaluatingErosionPub.pdf



November 6, 2013—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar

BIA’s Climate Change Adaptation Grants for Tribes:
Sean Hart, the BIA’s Climate Change Coordinator will join us to give information about the BIA’s Climate Change Adaptation grants. Proposals will be due November 29, 2013. The President’s 2013 Climate Action Plan committed federal support for tribes as they address climate change impacts. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has up to $600,000 available in fiscal year 2013/2014 available for competitive grants for tribal adaptation, training, and tribal travel support to participate in technical training, workshops, forums and cooperatives.

A copy of the RFP is available at ITEP’s website:
www4.nau.edu/tribalclimatechange/resources/docs/res_BIA2013_OTSClimateAdpatationGrantOffering.pdf

Adapting Region 10 Programs to Climate Change: How we are implementing the science and Executive orders.
Michael Cox will discuss the President’s Climate Action Plan, the findings from the recent Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report and its relevancy to Alaska, EPA activities in Alaska related to climate change, and discuss how to better engage with tribes.

He is currently the climate change advisor for EPA's Region 10 in Seattle. His main tasks are to help EPA programs integrate climate change into how they do their work and coordinate efforts with EPA partners. Michael has over 25 years of environmental experience with EPA, UNICEF, National Wildlife Federation, and the City of Seattle. His past work included working on issues related to toxics in the Columbia River, toxics and nutrients in Puget Sound, and nitrate contamination in groundwater and drinking water in Yakima County.
Presentation: Climate Change Presentation Alaska [pdf]



Tribal Climate Change Webinar Series: Climate Change, Its Impacts, and Climate Change Outreach and Education

This series of four webinars will provide basic information about climate change, its impacts on tribes in the United States, and outreach and education material and resources that tribes can use with their communities to increase their awareness and understanding of climate change. The webinars are being offered by the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals at Northern Arizona University with support from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Webinar 1: Climate Change-What it is and why it's important
Thursday, June 13, 2013—10:00-11:15 am Pacific

Maybe you’ve been hearing a lot about climate change, adaptation and mitigation, but you don’t feel like you know the basics. This presentation will review climate change terminology and go over the basics of climate change and why climate change is an important issue for everyone-- think "Climate Change 101." Presenter: Zack Guido, Associate Staff Scientist, Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS), University of Arizona

    Presentation:
    Click HERE for this presentation. [pdf]

Webinar 2: Indicators of Climate Change
Tuesday, June 18, 2013—10:00-11:15 am Pacific

One way to track and communicate the causes and effects of climate change is through the use of indicators. An indicator, such as a record of sea ice extent, represents the state or trend of certain environmental conditions over a given area and a specified time period. This presentation will provide an overview of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Climate Change Indicators in the United States, 2012 report, which presents a set of 26 indicators tracking observed signs of climate change in the United States. Presenter: Lesley Jantarasami and Mike Kolian, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation, Climate Change Division

    Presentation:
    Click HERE for this presentation. [pdf]

    Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar 3: Climate Change Impacts on Tribes
Tuesday, June 25, 2013 11:00-12:15 pm Pacific

Climate change is and will impact the peoples, lands and resources of indigenous communities. This presentation will provide an overview of climate change impacts and vulnerabilities of tribes in the United States. It will draw on the findings from the draft 2013 National Climate Assessment's (NCA) chapter on tribes, Impacts of Climate Change on Tribal, Indigenous, and Native Lands and Resources. The draft 2013 NCA has been going through the review process and is available at: http://ncadac.globalchange.gov/; the final report is expected to be available by early 2014. The co-presenters are members of the tribal chapter's author team. Co-Presenters: Bull Bennett, President, Kiksapa Consulting; Nancy Maynard, Emeritus Scientist, NASA; Patricia Cochran, Executive Director, Alaska Native Science Commission; Kathy Lynn, Project Coordinator, PNW Tribal Climate Change Project, University of Oregon; and Sue Wotkyns, Climate Change Program Manager, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Northern Arizona University

    Presentation:
    Click HERE for this presentation. [pdf]

    Video:
    Click HERE to view the video.

Webinar 4: Climate Change Outreach and Education
Friday, July 12, 2013—11:00 am-12:15 pm Pacific

Does your tribal community have little knowledge and understanding of climate change and its impacts? Are you trying to increase their awareness about climate change and ways to address it, such as mitigation and adaptation? This presentation will provide information about outreach and education material and resources that tribes can use in engaging their tribal community about climate change. It will include examples from the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals’ Environmental Education and Outreach Program. Presenter: Mansel Nelson, Program Coordinator, Environmental Education and Outreach Program, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals, Northern Arizona University

    Presentation:
    Click HERE for this presentation. [ppt]

    Videos:
    Click HERE to view Part 1.
    Click HERE to view Part 2.
    Click HERE to view Part 3.



Tuesday, March 12, 2013—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar

Sustainable Energy Opportunities: Best Practices for Alaska Tribes
This presentation will provide an overview of a renewable energy development resource guide for rural Alaska tribal communities. The guide provides a basic introduction to six major renewable energy sources, plus efficiency, describes their development and use, provides contacts and resources for more research as well as case studies, if any exist, where implementation of each project has proven effective. Finally, it has a short section on possible funding resources. Aiden’s presentation will provide an overview of the guide. Presented by Aiden Irish, student at the University of Portland. Aiden served as a Greater Research Opportunities (GRO) fellowship intern with US EPA last summer during which he compiled the guide. The guide is available at:
Guide: www.epa.gov/region10/pdf/tribal/Sustainable_Energy_Opportunities_Resource_Guide.pdf
Presentation/Slides: Sustainable Energy Opportunities [pdf]

Alaska Strategic Technical Assistance Response Team (AK-START) Funding Opportunity
AK-START is a program of the US Department of Energy, Office of Indian Energy, with additional support from the Denali Commission. The Program provides technical assistance to federally recognized Alaska Tribes and Alaska Native Corporations to develop and implement energy plans and projects for community and economic development. Application deadline is March 15. The technical assistance award also allows for additional consideration of energy-related equipment and associated costs up to $250,000. Presented by Brian Hirsch, Senior Project Leader, US Dept. of Energy - Alaska, National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
START Program Opportunities: http://energy.gov/indianenergy/resources/start-program
Presentation/Slides: Introduction to the Office and START Programs [pdf]



November 15, 2012—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar

Tribal Climate Change Funding Guide
Impacts from climate change, such as ocean acidification, sea level rise and species migration, may disproportionately affect American Indian and Alaska Native tribal culture and subsistence practice. Despite the growing awareness of climate change, funding to plan for and respond to climate change is extremely limited. It is important, then, to identify federal, state and non-governmental funding sources that may assist tribes in addressing climate change. The Tribal Climate Change Funding Guide describes funding resources that are directly related to climate change or can be used indirectly for adaptation efforts. The Pacific Northwest Tribal Climate Change Project at the University of Oregon and the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 Tribal Program Office developed this guide collaboratively. Presented by Kathy Lynn, University of Oregon.
    Tribal Climate Change Funding Guide: envs.uoregon.edu/tribal-climate/
    Guide for Tribal Leaders on U.S. Climate Change Programs: http://tribalclimate.uoregon.edu/
    Presentation/Slides [pdf format]

ITEP's Climate Change Trainings and Resources for Tribes
The Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals at Northern Arizona University provides tribes throughout the U.S. with training and assistance to build their capacity to manage their environmental resources. Sue Wotkyns, ITEP's Climate Change Program Manager, will provide an overview of the climate change trainings and informational resources that ITEP has developed for tribes over the last several years.
    Presentation/Slides [pdf format]



June 20, 2012—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar

Waste Erosion Assessment and Review (WEAR) Project
Coastal and river erosion has the potential to cause hazardous substances and garbage from Alaska's eroding landfills, closed dump sites, and contaminated sites to be released into the ocean and the state's rivers, jeopardizing Alaska's waters, fish and wildlife. The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation has begun a four-year $1.4 million project to inventory and prioritize those sites, and generate action plans to mitigate the impacts of erosion. Presented by Rebecca Colvin, State of Alaska.
    http://dec.alaska.gov/eh/sw/wear.html
    Presentation/Slides [pdf format]

ArcSEES--Arctic Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability
ArcSEES is an interagency, international, and interdisciplinary program designed to stimulate research and capacity building focused on the sustainability of the Arctic human-environmental-built system. A joint solicitation will support research projects that contribute to our understanding of the resiliency, predictability, and sustainability of the Arctic. Presented by Erica Key, Program Director, Arctic Observing Network, Anna Kerttula de Echave, Program Director, Arctic Social Science Program, and Nikoosh Carlo, AAAS Fellow, Office of Polar Programs, National Science Foundation.
    www.nsf.gov/pubs/2012/nsf12553/nsf12553.htm
    Presentation/Slides [pdf format]



May 15 and May 17, 2012
Start Time (for both sessions): 8 am Hawaii,10 am AK, 11 am PDT, 12 pm MDT,1 pm CDT, 2 pm EDT

The National Climate Assessment: An Update on the Tribal Chapter
Tribal organizations and other groups throughout the U.S. have been collaborating to write a chapter on tribes that will be part of the 2013 National Climate Assessment (NCA). This presentation will provide an overview of a preliminary draft of the chapter. The draft will be made available for a very short informal review period before it is submitted on June 1 to the National Climate Assessment Development and Advisory Committee to begin a more formal review process. Presented by Dr. Bull Bennett, Kiksapa Consulting, LLC, and Sue Wotkyns, Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals.

View the webinar recording:
Please check back soon!

Presentation/Slides:
    Presentation [pdf format]



March 14, 2012—Alaska Tribal Climate Change Webinar
Moose Creek Fish Passage Restoration Project,
presented by Jessica Winnestaffer, Department Director, Environmental Stewardship Dept, Chickaloon Native Village
    Presentation/Slides [pdf format]

Introduction to the Alaska Conservation Foundation and the Alaska Native Fund, presented by Anne Rothe, Director, Alaska Conservation Foundation.
    http://alaskaconservation.org/



December 5, 2011
Tribes and the National Climate Assessment

Bull Bennett, PhD, Kiksapa Consulting, LLC
Kiksapa Consulting, the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals (ITEP) and other tribal organizations and groups throughout the U.S. are collaborating to create a chapter on tribes that will be part of the 2013 National Climate Assessment. This is first time that a chapter on tribes will be included in the assessment-the chapter will provide an overview of change impacts on tribes and current adaptation and mitigation efforts. Dr. Bull Bennett of Kiksapa Consulting, LLC, is leading the chapter's technical input team and author team-during the webinar, he will provide information about the National Climate Assessment, the chapter on tribes, who is involved, the timeline, and how you can provide input.

View the webinar recording:
    Dec 5, 11 am-12 pm PAC [wmv file 55.9MB]
         Dec 5, 12:30-1:30 pm PAC

Presentation/Slides:
    NCA Tribal Webinar Presentation [pdf format]

For more information about Tribal Climate Change Webinars, please contact:
Sue Wotkyns, Program Manager
Tel: 928/523-1488
Email: Susan.Wotkyns@nau.edu


Last updated: July 10, 2014

 

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