Resources:
Impacts


Impacts of climate change on American Indians and Alaska Natives are documented in many of the presentations, news articles, and other resources listed on this page.

Sections:
» Tools and Guides

» Websites

» Reports and Other Documents

» Alaska and the Arctic

» Hawaii and Pacific Islands

» Pacific Northwest
» Southwest and Great Basin

» Prairies and High Plains

» Great Lakes Region

» Northeast

» Eastern Woodlands and the Gulf Coast




Tools & Guides    [Top]


  • Surging Seas (Climate Central)
    Global warming has raised global sea level about 8 inches since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges. A Climate Central analysis finds the odds of "century" or worse floods occurring by 2030 are on track to double or more, over widespread areas of the U.S. Search or navigate interactive map tool to see maps of areas below different amounts of sea level rise and flooding, down to neighborhood scale, matched with area timelines of risk. The tool also provides statistics of population, homes and land affected by city, county and state, plus links to factsheets, data downloads, action plans, embeddable widgets, and more.
    http://sealevel.climatecentral.org/

  • Native Communities and Climate Change
    This is a project of the University of Colorado Law School's Center for Energy and Environmental Security (CEES). The project seeks to provide resources for climate change adaptation and natural resource planning by American Indian tribes as well as to provide useful information to organizations and agencies working with Indian tribes on these issues. Website has a searchable database of documents on tribes and climate change.
    www.tribesandclimatechange.org/



Websites    [Top]
  • Video: Trust Film Series
    TRUST is a series of 10 ground-breaking mini-documentaries examining the geographic, economic and societal impacts of climate change on our nation's youth and their communities. These films tell the stories of 10 youth plaintiffs (including a Navajo and an Alaska Native) who are suing their government to compel real climate recovery plans and protect the public trust. Co-produced by Our Children's Trust, the iMatter Campaign and WITNESS.
    http://ourchildrenstrust.org/node/141

  • Video: What does climate change mean for indigenous communities?
    Video of Native American Environmental Leader Tom Goldtooth talking at the United Nations COP17 Climate in Durban, South Africa. 12/5/11.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFRxJFUefw8&noredirect=1

  • Climate Change Impacts to Tribal Communities
    The USGS is working with Native American communities and organizations to understand climate change impacts to their land and neighborhoods. Projects include interviews with indigenous Alaskans to understand their personal observations of climate change, as well as studying how climate change is impacting sand dunes and posing risks to the Navajo Nation. 9/23/11
    www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_science_pick/climate-change-impacts-to-tribal-communities/

  • Climate Witness in Action (World Wildlife Fund)
    Through Climate Witness, WWF connects with people around the world and provides them with an opportunity to share stories about how climate change impacts their lives here and now. This is a growing global community of people telling their climate change stories through words, videos, and photos.
    wwf.panda.org/about_our_earth/aboutcc/problems/people_at_risk/personal_stories/

  • Conversations with the Earth
    Conversations with the Earth is a growing network of indigenous groups and communities living in critical ecosystems around the world. As part of CWE, the indigenous communities are able to share their local stories of climate change – both impacts and response. By supporting the creation of sustainable autonomous indigenous media around the world, and by keeping in contact with communities that have participated in the creation of CWE photostories CWE fosters long-term relationships with communities, based on principles of Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC), local control and support for indigenous media capacity.
    www.conversationsearth.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=18&Itemid=1

  • On the Frontlines of Climate Change: A global forum for indigenous peoples, small islands and vulnerable communities
    The Frontlines Forum seeks community-based experiences with climate change: impacts, opportunities and adaptation strategies. It provides a platform for sharing observations, concerns and innovations. The Forum invites contributions from indigenous or rural communities in small islands, high altitudes, the Arctic, desert margins and other vulnerable environments.
    www.climatefrontlines.org/

  • The Climate Race: How global warming is already affecting us and the tough choices we have to make
    Audio and video recordings, slideshows, and resources. American Public Media @2009
    http://marketplace.publicradio.org/projects/project_display.php?proj_identifier=2009/10/26/climate_race_project

  • Fever – a Video Guide
    Series of 4 short films for indigenous communities to raise awareness and build knowledge about the issue of climate change and how it relates to indigenous peoples, cultures, rights and territories. In these films we hear the stories of indigenous peoples from communities in Ecuador, Nicaragua, the Philippines and Indonesia. The films and a facilitator’s guide can be downloaded for free. These films are provided by LifeMosaic, a Scottish non-profit that supports indigenous peoples in the humid tropics to get their voices heard, and to access the information that they need to make informed decisions about their futures.
    http://lifemosaic.net/en/home.php

  • Video: Where Words Touch the Earth
    Students from American Indian Tribal Colleges interview Elders, other students, and community members to provide a Native American perspective on climate change and its effects on their communities.
    www.teachersdomain.org/special/nasawords/

  • Video: Indigenous issues: Climate Change
    Video project undertaken by indigenous community leaders at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York, May 2008. Impacts of climate change on indigenous communities around the globe and advice from community elders to the outside world. 13 minutes.
    www.insightshare.org/video_UNPF.html

  • Indigenous Peoples Climate Change Assessment Initiative
    IPCCA offers a conceptual framework that will empower local indigenous communities to assess the impact of climate change. Simultaneously, an assessment of global climate change will be performed to enhance understanding of how indigenous peoples are affected. The two approaches will be synthesized to produce practical local responses and national and global policy responses.
    http://ipcca.info/

  • Video: Chief Arvol Looking Horse Speaks of White Buffalo Prophecy
    Chief Arvol Looking Horse of the Lakota Sioux Nation speaks about the White Buffalo Prophecy. The appearance of the white buffalo is a blessing and a warning of climate change and other changes. 10 minutes.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHqVdZmpRgI&feature=player_embedded#at=137

  • States of Change (Climate Central)
    Changes in our climate may often seem imperceptible, happening in such small increments that differences are difficult to notice. Or the changes may seem to be happening in a distant location, to people we don’t know and at a time in the far-off future. Website brings you critical information on your changing climate; changes that are taking place now, and taking place in your hometown, city or state. Each week the website will feature content for a new state, and continue adding stories on existing states. Copyright © 2011 Climate Central.
    www.climatecentral.org/features/states-of-change/



Reports and Other Documents    [Top]
  • Guide on Climate Change and Indigenous Peoples—Second Edition (Tebtebba Indigenous Peoples' International Centre for Policy Research and Education)
    Report discusses the basics of climate change, mitigation and adaptation measures, and the impact of climate change on indigenous peoples. It gives examples of adaptation and mitigation processes practiced by indigenous people. It further discusses the risks and opportunities that Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) presents to indigenous people. Copyright © Tebtebba Foundation, 2009.
    www.eldis.org/go/display&type=Document&id=59528?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+eldis-any+%28Eldis+latest+research%29

  • Tribal Sovereignty and Climate Change: Moving Toward Intergovernmental Cooperation
    Article in book: Navigating Climate Change Policy: The Opportunities of Federalism (Edella Schlager, Kirsten Engel, & Sally Rider eds., 2011).
    http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2014361##

  • Press Release: AAAS Coalition Explores Perspectives of Indigenous Communities on Climate Change (American Assoc. for the Advancement of Science)
    Overview of a panel discussion on "Indigenous Voices in Scientific Debate: Human Rights, the Environment and Climate Change." Held at the January meeting of the AAAS Science and Human Rights Coalition. © 2012. American Association for the Advancement of Science. 2/6/12.
    www.aaas.org/news/releases/2012/0206indigenous_rights.shtml

  • The Climate Change and Your Health Initiative (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    This effort is designed to highlight some of the major health risks associated with climate change in the United States and attempt to quantify their impacts. Includes an ongoing series of reports that documents how climate change is already affecting our health, discusses potential future impacts, and outlines some concrete steps we can take to protect against the health risks of global warming. Each report features an analysis of a specific climate-related health risk. Available reports include After the Storm: The Hidden Health Risks of Flooding in a Warming World (March 2012) and Rising Temperatures, Worsening Ozone Pollution (June 2011).
    www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/science_and_impacts/impacts/climate-change-and-your-health.html

  • Report of the Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change
    The Indigenous Peoples' Global Summit on Climate Change was held in Anchorage, Alaska, on April 20-24, 2009. The Summit enabled indigenous peoples from all regions of the globe to exchange their knowledge and experience in adapting to the impacts of climate change, and to develop key messages and recommendations to assist Indigenous Peoples in their global negotiations on climate change. This meeting report documents the various thematic sessions, regional reports, presentations, and discussions over the course of the summit. 2009.
    www.unutki.org/news.php?news_id=88&doc_id=102

  • Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health (Committee on the Effect of Climate Change on Indoor Air Quality and Public Health; Institute of Medicine)
    Addresses the impacts that climate change may have on the indoor environment and the resulting health effects. It finds that steps taken to mitigate climate change may cause or exacerbate harmful indoor environmental conditions. The book discusses the role the US EPA should take in informing the public, health professionals, and those in the building industry about potential risks and what can be done to address them. The study also recommends that building codes account for climate change projections; that federal agencies join to develop or refine protocols and testing standards for evaluating emissions from materials, furnishings, and appliances used in buildings; and that building weatherization efforts include consideration of health effects. Written primarily for the EPA and other federal agencies, organizations, and researchers with interests in public health; the environment; building design, construction, and operation; and climate issues. 2011.
    http://books.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13115

  • Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations Project (Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute)
    The project documents existing effects of climate change on Indigenous peoples and their homelands in Pacific Rim countries, describes examples of Indigenous nation responses to local circumstances and at the international level, and recommends future paths for Indigenous nation governments to consider.
    Website http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/climate.html
    Report: Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/IndigClimate2.pdf
    Powerpoint: Climate Change and Pacific Rim Indigenous Nations http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/IndigClimate2007.ppt
    Community organizing booklet: Native Peoples: The "Miner’s Canary" of Climate Change http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/climatechange.final.pdf
    Journal article: Indigenous Nations' Responses to Climate Change (American Indian Culture and Research Journal 32:3, 2008) http://academic.evergreen.edu/g/grossmaz/Indigenous%20Nations%27%20Responses.pdf

  • The Tribal Path Forward: Confronting Climate Change and Conserving Nature
    Article by Garrit Voggesser, Manager of the National Wildlife Federation’s Tribal Lands Conservation Program, provides an overview of some of the impacts of climate change on tribes and what some tribes are doing to address climate change issues. Wildlife Professional, V. 4, No. 4, Winter 2010 issue, Copyright©2010 The Wildlife Society. *
    www.wildlifeprofessional-digital.org/wildlifeprofessional/winter2010?pg=26#pg26

  • The Mystic Lake Declaration
    Declaration made at the Native Peoples/Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop II, Prior Lake, MN. Nov 21, 2009.
    Declaration: http://portal3.aihec.org/sites/NPNH/Document%20Center/The%20Mystic%20Lake%20Declaration2.htm
    Workshop website: http://portal3.aihec.org/sites/NPNH/Pages/Default.aspx

  • Climate Change Puts Tribal Way of Life at Risk
    Article describes climate change impacts on several tribes, and also some renewable energy projects by tribes. 2010 AOL Inc. All Rights Reserved, 11/21/10.
    www.aolnews.com/nation/article/climate-change-puts-tribal-way-of-life-at-risk/19720954

  • Using Traditional Native American Knowledge to Document Effects of Climate Change (US Geological Survey)
    News release about value of traditional knowledge, Feb. 13, 2004.
    www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=119

  • Impacts of Climate Change on Tribes in the United States (National Tribal Air Association)
    This document is a compilation of comments and papers received from tribes in response to a request from US EPA. The focus of the document is on climate change impacts currently experienced by tribes; the comments are grouped by geographic region. Other concerns regarding potential impacts have also been noted throughout the document. A summary of tribal recommendations on what steps need to be taken to address these issues is included at the end of the document. December 2009.
    Impacts of Climate Change on Tribes in the United States

  • Extreme Weather and Climate Change: Understanding the Link, Managing the Risk (Pew Center on Global Climate Change)
    White paper by Pew Center on Global Climate Change focuses on the link between extreme weather and climate. June 2011.
    www.pewclimate.org/publications/extreme-weather-and-climate-change

  • Facing the Storm: Indian Tribes, Climate-Induced Weather Extremes, and the Future for Indian Country
    Report by the National Wildlife Federation about the impacts of extreme weather events on tribes. North American Indian Tribes are especially harmed by climate change, as more ecological shifts and more frequent, more extreme weather events occur, a new study concludes. Because Tribes are heavily dependent on natural resources, severe weather events like droughts, floods, wildfires, and snowstorms make tribal communities particularly vulnerable and impact American Indians and Alaska Natives more than they impact the general population. © 1996-2011 National Wildlife Federation, 8/3/11.
    Facing the Storm
    Press release: www.nwf.org/en/ News-and-Magazines/ Media-Center/ News-by-Topic/ Global-Warming/ 2011/08-03-11-Climate- Change-Hurts-Indian- Tribes-Disproportionately.aspx

  • Indigenous People Sound the Alarm on Climate Change
    Article about the "Seeking Balance: Indigenous Knowledge, Western Science and Climate Change" conference held at the National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, DC. © 1996-2010 National Geographic Society, 10/11/11.
    http://newswatch.nationalgeographic.com/2011/10/11/indigenous-people-climate-change/

  • Social Vulnerability and Equity in the United States in the Context of Climate Change: Synthesis of Literature (USDA Forest Service)
    This literature synthesis examines the effects of climate change, which are expected to be more severe for some segments of society than others because of geographic location, the degree of association with climate-sensitive environments, and unique cultural, economic, or political characteristics of particular landscapes and human populations. The synthesis reviews what available science says about social vulnerability and climate change and documents the emergence of issues not currently addressed in academic literature. In so doing, the synthesis identifies knowledge gaps and questions for future research. 8/8/11.
    http://tribalclimate.uoregon.edu/files/2010/11/pnw_gtr8381.pdf

  • Strengthening the Scientific Understanding of Climate Change Impacts on Freshwater Resources of the United States (USGS)
    Report assesses the status of scientific information available to help understand the impacts of climate change and other stressors on US freshwater resources and calls for modernization of systems to help monitor and sustain water supplies. The report was prepared by a federal interagency panel led by USGS and developed in concert with the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ), NOAA, and the Office of Science and Technology Policy. The report reviews the state of existing science and identifies strategies for improving systems to collect climate-related data and water monitoring information. The improvements are intended to help water managers predict, respond and adapt to the effects of climate change on the nation's freshwater supplies so that they can help ensure adequate water quantity and quality. 10/3/11.
    www.doi.gov/news/pressreleases/Interior-Report-Assesses-Scientific-Water-Monitoring-and-Modeling-Systems-and-Calls-for-Modernization-to-Help-Sustain-Water-Supplies.cfm

  • Global Change and Extreme Hydrology: Testing Conventional Wisdom (National Research Council)
    Workshop proceedings report from January 2010 workshop that brought together atmospheric scientists, hydrologists, water managers, and decision makers to examine how climate warming translates into hydrologic extremes like floods and droughts. It presents an overview of the state of the science in terms of climate change and extreme hydrologic events and examines the conventional wisdom that, because a warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor, climate change will accelerate the hydrologic cycle, fuel more evaporation, and generate more precipitation. 2011.
    www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=13211#description

  • Podcast: What Does Climate Change Have to Do With Human Health? with John Balbus (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences)
    Interview with Dr. John Balbus, senior advisor for public health at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Climate change is not just a problem for rivers and reservoirs that are running dry, or forests and grasslands that are seeing an increased incidence of wildfire, or Arctic wildlife stressed by rapidly changing ecosystems. It’s a problem for human health, too, as John Balbus discusses with host Ashley Ahearn. It can be tricky to attribute specific health effects to climate change, which reflects trends in the weather averaged over decades. But short-term weather fluctuations are known to alter the risk of several diseases. As short-term fluctuations become long-term patterns, health effects also may adopt new patterns.
    http://ehp03.niehs.nih.gov/article/fetchArticle.action?articleURI=info%3Adoi%2F10.1289%2Fehp.trp090111

  • Health and Climate Change: 7 Ways You Are Being Harmed
    From the increase in frequency of heatwaves to the spread of infectious diseases, changing weather patterns are already affecting us all. The consequences of climate change sometimes appear far off. But warming and changing weather patterns are already driving changes in public health. Article discusses some ways that climate change affects us: heatwaves; asthma and allergies; spread of infectious diseases; pests and diseases affecting forests; crops and marine life; winter weather anomalies; drought; and food insecurity. Copyright © 2011 by The Atlantic Monthly Group, 9/26/11.
    www.theatlantic.com/life/archive/2011/09/health-and-climate-change-7-ways-you-are-being-harmed/245607/

  • Climate Change Threatens Health (NRDC)
    Climate change is one of the most serious public health threats facing the nation, but few people are aware of how it can affect them. Children, the elderly, and communities living in poverty are among the most vulnerable. Website provides information on climate-health threats, actions being taken to prepare communities, and what you can do. © Natural Resources Defense Council.
    www.nrdc.org/health/climate/

  • With Deaths of Forests, a Loss of Key Climate Protectors
    NYT article about the dying forests in the US and around the world, and the implications the loss of these forests has for levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. © 2011 The New York Times Company, 10/1/11.
    www.nytimes.com/2011/10/01/science/earth/01forest.html

  • Wildland Fire and Climate Change (USDA Forest Service)
    Climate change will likely alter the atmospheric patterns that affect fire weather. Changes in fire patterns will in turn impact carbon cycling, forest structure, and species composition. In the summary paper 'Wildland Fire and Climate Change', Forest Service scientists who study wildfire explain what is known about these interactions and what management options are available to resource managers.
    Website also provides readings on this subject, descriptions of some of the current Forest Service research projects that study fire and climate change, recommended websites, and fire-related tools for resource managers.
    www.fs.fed.us/ccrc/topics/wildland-fire.shtml

  • Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (National Research Council)
    This 28-page booklet is based on Ecological Impacts of Climate Change (2009), a report by an independent panel of experts convened by the National Research Council. It explains general themes about the ecological consequences of climate change and identifies examples of ecological changes across the United States.
    http://dels-old.nas.edu/climatechange/ecological-impacts.shtml

  • More Extreme Weather and the US Energy Infrastructure (National Wildlife Federation)
    Report details how more severe droughts, more intense tropical storms, and heavier rainfall events could cause major disruptions in the existing systems that deliver energy to the nation, even as these existing energy systems are already beginning to crumble. Future investments must transform the US energy infrastructure to be resilient in the face of more extreme weather and climate. © 1996-2011 National Wildlife Federation, 2011.
    www.nwf.org/en/Global-Warming/What-is-Global-Warming/Global-Warming-is-Causing-Extreme-Weather/Energy-Infrastructure.aspx

  • Climate Stabilization Targets: Emissions, Concentrations, and Impacts over Decades and Millennia (National Research Council of the National Academies)
    Report by National Research Council says that choices made now about carbon dioxide emissions reductions will affect climate change impacts experienced not just over the next few decades but also in coming centuries and millennia. The report estimates changes in precipitation, stream flow, wildfires, crop yields, and sea level rise that can be expected with different degrees of warming. Report offers likely ranges and best estimates of the equilibrium warming that can be expected from various levels of CO2 in the atmosphere. July 2010.
    www.nap.edu/catalog.php?record_id=12877

  • Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States (US Global Change Science Program)
    Comprehensive scientific report on current and pending impacts of global climate change in the U.S., and why it is important to act now, rather than later, to minimize those impacts. June 2009.
    Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States
    Website: www.globalchange.gov/publications/reports/scientific-assessments/us-impacts

  • Analyses of the effects of global change on human health and welfare and human systems (US Climate Change Science Program)
    Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.6, July 2008.
    www.climatescience.gov/Library/sap/sap4-6/final-report/

  • The effects of climate change on agriculture, land resources, water resources, and biodiversity in the United States
    (US Climate Change Science Program) Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.3, May 2008.
    www.climatescience.gov/Library/sap/sap4-3/final-report/

  • Native Communities and Climate Change (Univ. of Colorado's Natural Resources Law Center)
    www.colorado.edu/law/centers/nrlc/publications/ClimateChangeReport-FINAL%20_9.16.07_.pdf

  • Climate Change 2007: Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change)
    Working Group II Report.
    www.ipcc.ch/

  • US National Assessment of The Potential Consequences of Climate Variability and Change (US Global Change Research Program)
    Has sections on regions of the US and a section called Native Peoples, Native Homelands. 2000.
    www.usgcrp.gov/usgcrp/nacc/background/regions.htm

  • Global Warming: Early Warning Signs (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    Map illustrating local impacts of climate change.
    www.climatehotmap.org/index.html

  • Regional Impacts of Climate Change: Four Case Studies in the United States (Pew Center on Global Climate Change)
    Case studies of Midwest, Gulf Coast, Chesapeake Bay, Western US
    www.pewclimate.org/regional_impacts

  • The Economic Impacts of Climate Change and the Costs of Inaction (Center for Integrative Environmental Research, Univ. of Maryland)
    Studies on all regions of US and on individual states.
    www.cier.umd.edu/climateadaptation/index.html



Alaska and the Arctic    [Top]


Alaska Conservation Solutions
Alaska Conservation Solutions provides information about the many impacts of climate change on Alaska. You can keep up to date by subscribing to the monthly report. The website also features an Alaska Carbon Calculator and a Yup'ik translation of the calculator.

www.alaskaconservationsolutions.com/acs/index.php


  • Perspectives on the Evidence and Impacts of Changing Environments in the Far North
    Article about impacts of climate change on people in the Arctic, traditional knowledge, adaptation, and the interconnection between Arctic and global ecosystems. The Arctic Institute, © copyright 2011. 2/16/12.
    www.thearcticinstitute.org/2012/02/perspectives-on-evidence-and-impacts-of.html

  • Total Environment of Change: Impacts of Climate Change and Social Transitions on Subsistence Fisheries in Northwest Alaska
    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing rapid changes as a result of global climate change, with significant implications for the livelihoods of Arctic peoples. In this paper, based on ethnographic research conducted with the Iñupiaq communities of Noatak and Selawik in northwestern Alaska, we detail prominent environmental changes observed over the past twenty to thirty years and their impacts on subsistence-based lifestyles. Moerlein, K. J., and C. Carothers. Ecology and Society 17(1): 10. Copyright © 2012 by the authors. 2012.
    www.ecologyandsociety.org/vol17/iss1/art10/

  • AKSIK—Stories about Adaptation and Subsistence: native Voices from the Frontlines of Climate Change
    Website serves as a video library of two native villages in Alaska—Savoonga and Shaktoolik—on the front line of climate change. It documents the impacts they are witnessing, describes their adaptation strategies, and provides alerts about their needs and their advice for our leaders. St. Lawrence University, © 2011.
    http://aksik.org/

  • Video: Climate Change from Inuit Elders Experiences
    Observations of climate change by elders from Arviat, Nunavut, with English translations. 11/23/11.
    http://bsnorrell.blogspot.com/2011/11/video-climate-change-from-inuit-elders.html

  • Alaskans Weather Epic Bering Sea Storm
    A giant Bering Sea storm with hurricane-force winds roared up the western Alaska coastline Wednesday, sending waves over storm barriers, knocking out electricity, flooding parts of some villages and leading to evacuations. © Copyright 2011, The Anchorage Daily News, 11/9/11.
    www.adn.com/2011/11/09/2163238/alaskans-weather-epic-bering-sea.html

  • Bering Sea storm: Has global warming made Alaska more vulnerable?
    Bering Sea storm winds are lashing the coast of Alaska. Sea ice extending out from the shoreline has protected the coast from past Bering Sea storm surges, but there is little such ice this year, and global warming is likely to blame. © The Christian Science Monitor, 11/9/11.
    www.csmonitor.com/USA/2011/1109/Bering-Sea-storm-Has-global-warming-made-Alaska-more-vulnerable

  • For Inuits Dealing With Climate Change, Science Can Be Slow and Bumbling
    An Inuk woman practicing a traditional craft finds the sealskin she's working with doesn't have the nice fur of times past and it has rotten patches that tear easily. Her husband finds that hunting seals is more difficult than in the past because the formerly stable edge of an ice-floe has broken off and fewer seals are there. He carries a gun as protection against increasing numbers of polar bears. They are among Native people in the circumpolar North who experience climate change in their everyday lives and for whom conventional science, despite its ability to describe the change, sometimes has been unhelpful. © 2011 Indian Country Today Media Network, LLC, 10/25/11.
    http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/10/for-inuits-dealing-with-climate-change-science-can-be-slow-and-bumbling/

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to Alaska Boreal and Arctic (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2010/224. July 2010.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Alaska Boreal and Arctic

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to Alaska Maritime and Transitional (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2010/223. July 2010.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Maritime and Transitional

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Alaska (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Alaska

  • Climate Change in Kiana, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium)
    This report describes a comprehensive assessment of climate change related health effects in Kiana, Alaska. Kiana is an Inupiat community of approximately 361 residents, located on the Kobuk River, about 60 miles east of Kotzebue. Described health effects include permafrost thaw-driven damage to water and waste water infrastructure, decreased food secruity and safety and increased travel hazards related to river change. October 2011.
    www.anthc.org/chs/ces/climate/climateandhealthreports.cfm

  • News Release: Observations of Climate Change from Indigenous Alaskans (USGS)
    Personal interviews with Alaska Natives in the Yukon River Basin provide unique insights on climate change and its impacts, helping develop adaptation strategies for these local communities. The USGS coordinated interviews with Yup'ik hunters and elders in the villages of St. Mary's and Pitka's Point, Alaska, to document their observations of climate change. By integrating scientific studies with indigenous observation, these multiple forms of knowledge allow for a more comprehensive understanding of the complex challenges posed by climate change. The indigenous knowledge encompasses observations, lessons and stories about the environment that have been handed down for generations, providing a long history of environmental knowledge. These observations can also help uncover new areas for scientists to study. US Geological Survey, 9/13/11.
    New release: www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=2931
    An article in Human Organization: http://sfaa.metapress.com/app/home/contribution.asp?referrer=parent&backto=issue,4,10;journal,1,278;linkingpublicationresults,1:113218,1

  • Video: USGS Science: Walrus Haul-Out 2011 (USGS)
    Female Pacific walruses and their calves traditionally spend summers far from shore, diving for benthic invertebrates over the shallow continental shelf waters of the Chukchi Sea. These female walruses and their calves prefer to rest between forage bouts on sea ice drifting above their feeding grounds. However, in recent years loss of summer sea ice over the continental shelf has forced many walruses to travel to the northwest coast of Alaska where they haul-out on shore to rest. This large herd of walruses hauled out near Pt. Lay Alaska in August of 2011. Video length 3:22. US Geological Survey, 8/25/11.
    http://gallery.usgs.gov/videos/445

  • Climate Change in the Pacific Region (US Fish and Wildlife Service)
    Website includes information about impacts of climate change in the Pacific Northwest.
    www.fws.gov/pacific/Climatechange/index.html

  • Tribal Resolutions on Global Warming from Alaska Native Tribes and Villages (National Indian law Library)
    162 Tribal and Corporate resolutions calling on Congress and the Executive Office to adopt legislation reducing carbon emissions; brought to Washington in March 2007.
    www.narf.org/nill/triballaw/climate/index.htm

  • Audio: Native America Calling: Adapting to Climate Change
    Native American Calling radio show that aired on Feb 11, 2011, focused on climate change and its impacts in Alaska. Guests included Oscar Kawagley (Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks) and Gregg Garfin (Univ. of Arizona). Listen to the audio recording!
    www.nativeamericacalling.com/

  • Inuit Lives and Diets Change as Ice Shifts
    Article about how the changing climate is impacting the lives and diet of Inuits in the Canadian Arctic. ©2011 Cable News Network, 12/30/10.
    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/americas/12/30/inuit.impact.climate.change/index.html?hpt=C2

  • Video: Inuit Knowledge and Climate Change
    Nunavut-based director Zacharias Kunuk and researcher and filmmaker Dr. Ian Mauro have teamed up with Inuit communities to document their knowledge and experience regarding climate change. This new documentary, the world’s first Inuktitut language film on the topic, takes the viewer “on the land” with elders and hunters to explore the social and ecological impacts of a warming Arctic. This unforgettable film helps us to appreciate Inuit culture and expertise regarding environmental change and indigenous ways of adapting to it. Exploring centuries of Inuit knowledge, allowing the viewer to learn about climate change first-hand from Arctic residents themselves, the film portrays Inuit as experts regarding their land and wildlife and makes it clear that climate change is a human rights issue affecting this ingenious Indigenous culture. Hear stories about Arctic melting and how Inuit believe that human and animal intelligence are key to adaptability and survival in a warming world. October 2010.
    www.isuma.tv/hi/en/inuit-knowledge-and-climate-change

  • Stories That Light up the Dark
    Article about wealth of knowledge and wisdom that can be found in cultural and family stories. Gives example of Inupiat stories of past climate changes. Yes! Magazine, Fall 2010 issue. 9/17/10.
    www.yesmagazine.org/issues/a-resilient-community/stories-that-light-up-the-dark?b_start:int=0&-C

  • Video: Sheila Watt-Cloutier on Climate Change and Human Rights
    Presentation on the impacts of climate change in the Arctic , given by Sheila Watt-Cloutier, a Canadian Inuit activist. She has been a political representative for Inuit at the regional, national and international levels, most recently as International Chair for Inuit Circumpolar Council (formerly the Inuit Circumpolar Conference).
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlSh4XeoLBA&feature=player_embedded

  • Audio: Climate Change Threatens Alaska Villages
    North Country Public Radio’s interview with a professor who describes impacts on the village of Shaktoolik on the Bering Strait. Website also has an interview with a resident of Shaktoolik and a slide show. © 2010 North Country Public Radio, 8/7/10.
    www.northcountrypublicradio.com/news/story/16271/climate-change-threatens-alaskan-villages

  • Climate Change is Having Serious, Real-time Impacts on Subsistence Resources and Subsistence Users
    Written testimony of Mary C. Pete, Commissioner, US Arctic Research Commission, Field Hearing on "The Changing Arctic: Implications for Federal Resources and Local Communities" before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, August 19, 2010.
    www.arctic.gov/testimony/pete-08-19-10.pdf

  • Another Symbol of the Arctic's Complex Ecosystem Finds Itself on Thin Ice
    New York Times article about changes in Arctic sea ice and how these changes impact walruses, and about the Sea Ice for Walrus Outlook project. Copyright 2010 E&E Publishing., 8/10/10.
    www.nytimes.com/cwire/2010/08/10/10climatewire-another-symbol-of-the-arctics-complex-ecosyst-8466.html?pagewanted=1

  • A Fragile Past - Archaeologists are Scrambling as Accelerated Erosion Sweeps Away Artifacts on Alaska's Arctic Coast
    Article about impacts of coastal erosion on gravesites and artifacts located along Alaska’s Arctic coast, and the efforts of archaeologists to study and preserve them. © 2008 Anchorage Press, 5/19/10.
    www.anchoragepress.com/articles/2010/05/19/news/doc4bf46dd8b550c180204696.txt

  • Small Village May Model Future Alaska
    Article about the melting of permafrost in Koliganek, a village in southwest Alaska, and the work of a scientist who has set up ground monitoring stations in 170 villages. Geophysical Institute, Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks. April 29,2010.
    www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF20/2009.html

  • Barrow, Alaska: Ground Zero for Climate Change
    Article about impacts of climate change, observations of the Inupiat, and studies by scientists in Barrow, Alaska, the northernmost city in the United States. Smithsonian magazine, March 2010.
    www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/Barrow-Alaska-Ground-Zero-for-Climate-Change.html

  • CU: Alaska’s Northern Coast Eroding Quickly
    Daily Camera article and video about study documenting erosion of parts of northern Alaska coastline at rates of 35-40 feet per year. © Copyright 2009, Media News group. 12/14/09.
    www.dailycamera.com/news/ci_13996704

  • Webinar: Berry Resources and Human Health Under the Cloud of Climate Change (US EPA)
    Webinair about Alaska Berry Project investigating anti-diabetic properties of native wild berries and potential impacts of climate change on berry quality and abundance. October 14, 2009
    www.epa.gov/ncer/tribalresearch/meetings/index.html

  • Heat Stroke in Alaska's Arctic
    Article discusses public health concerns that warmer days in some Alaska villages may lead to increased risk for heat stress. Copyright © 2011 Alaska Dispatch, 7/20/11.
    www.alaskadispatch.com/article/heat-stroke-alaskas-arctic

  • Climate Change and Health Effects in Northwest Alaska
    This article provides examples of adverse health effects, including weather-related injury, food insecurity, mental health issues, and water infrastructure damage, and the responses to these effects that are currently being applied in two Northwest Alaska communities. Glob Health Action. © 2011 Michael Brubaker et al. Published online 10/18/11.
    www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3198120/

  • Health Impact Assessment – A Novel Approach for Understanding Climate Change in Alaska
    Climate change is having a dramatic impact on the lives of Arctic people. Health impact studies performed in Point Hope Alaska identifies specific health effects and helps in development of community specific recommendations for adaptation. International Journal of Circumpolar Health, 6/23/11.
    www.ijch.fi/show_abstract.php?abstract_id=1104

  • Climate Change in Noatak, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium)
    Report describes a comprehensive assessment of climate change related health effects in Noatak, Alaska. Noatak is an Inupiat community of approximately 500 residents, located on the west bank of the Noatak River, about 55 miles north of Kotzebue. Described health effects include permafrost thaw-driven damage to water and waste water infrastructure, decreased water security and safety due to river change, and decreased food security. June 2011.
    www.anthc.org/chs/ces/climate/climateandhealthreports.cfm

  • Climate Change in Kivalina, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium)
    Report describes a comprehensive assessment of climate change related health effects in Kivalina, Alaska. Kivalina is an Inupiat community of approximately 400 residents, located on a small barrier island in Northwestern Alaska. Described health effects include damage to health infrastructure, decreased water safety and security, decreased food safety and security, increased risk of injury related to travel and subsistence activities, increased risk of disease resulting from interruptions to sanitation infrastructure, and increased mental stress related to seasonal storm and flood events. January 2011.
    www.anthc.org/chs/ces/climate/climateandhealthreports.cfm

  • Climate Change in Point Hope, Alaska: Strategies for Community Health (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium’s Center for Climate and Health)
    This is the first climate change health impact assessment performed in Alaska. The report describes impacts, explores positive and negative health effects, and offers specific recommendations for adaptation strategies. The community of Point Hope is located at the westernmost point on the northwest Alaska coast. Life in Point Hope revolves around the harvest of sea mammals: walrus, seal, and whale. Climate change is increasing the risk of injury, interfering with the harvest of traditional foods, altering water quality, and decreasing food security. August, 2010.
    www.anthc.org/chs/ces/climate/climateandhealthreports.cfm

  • Climate Change Effects on Traditional Inupiaq Food Cellars (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium)
    Paper on special concern identified in Point Hope during recent Climate Change Assessment: the thawing of traditional food storage cellars due to warming soil temperature. Climate change is a likely cause and adaptive strategies are necessary to restore food security for Point Hope and other communities that depend on traditional storage cellars. June 2009.
    Climate Change Effects on Traditional Inupiaq Food Cellars

  • Source Drinking Water Challenges Resulting from Changes to an Arctic Tundra Lake (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium)
    Paper about extreme blooms of organic material in the source water lake in Point Hope. If warm temperatures continue, organic blooms will become a reoccurring problem for Point Hope and other communities that depend on tundra lakes for their drinking water supply. July 2009.
    Source Drinking Water Challenges Resulting from Changes to an Arctic Tundra Lake

  • Climate Change and Mental Health: Uncertainty and Vulnerability for Alaska Natives (Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium’s Center for Climate and Health)
    Paper provides an academic review of Alaska Native climate change mental health impact pathways, and potential responses to mental health effects. April 2010.
    Climate Change and Mental Health: Uncertainty and Vulnerability for Alaska Natives

  • Center for Climate and Health, Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium
    CCH works closely with governments at the local and regional level, academic institutions and public and private organizations to understand local changes and to develop strategies that encourage wellness, resilience and sustainability. With funding from the Indian Health Services, CCH is performing comprehensive local and regional surveys of health effects related to climate change. CCH also provides consultation on climate adaption and mitigation.
    www.anthc.org/chs/ces/climate/

  • Arctic Health-- Climate Change (University of Alaska Anchorage)
    Website provides numerous links to websites, publications, and multimedia presentations covering the impacts of climate change on the health, activities, and well-being of people in the Arctic. This page provides links to climate-change observations from both the scientific-research and the traditional-knowledge points of view.
    www.arctichealth.org/climatechange.php#org

  • Presentation: Climate Change In Alaska
    Presentation given by Rosalie Kalistook (Orutsararmiut Native Council) at the National Tribal Forumprovides overview of climate change impacts on Alaska native villages. July 2010.
    Presentation

  • Presentation: Climate Change Impacts
    Presentation given by Millie Hawley (Kivalina IRA Council) at the National Tribal Forum provides update on climate change impacts on Kivalina. July 2010.
    Presentation

  • Presentation: Climate Change Update: Alaskan Rural Village Perspective
    Powerpoint presentation given by Millie Hawley (Kivalina) at the EPA Region 10 Tribal Leaders Summit, September 2009. Update on climate change impacts on Kivalina and relocation plans.
    Presentation

  • Alaska Center for Climate Assessment and Policy (Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks)
    Assesses the socioeconomic and biophysical impacts.
    http://ine.uaf.edu/accap/

  • Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis(National Snow and Ice Data Center)
    Provides daily updates on sea ice data.
    www.nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/

  • NSIDC Data on Virtual Globes: Google Earth (National Snow and Ice Data Center
    The National Snow and Ice Data Center offers some of their data in the form of images. Their goal is to help people better understand the cryosphere—where the world is frozen—by making their data more visible and interactive. Website has Google Earth files, including a narrated Climate Change Tour of Cold Places.
    http://nsidc.org/data/virtual_globes/

  • Alaska Baseline Erosion Assessment (US Army Corps of Engineers Alaska District)
    The purpose of this study has been to coordinate, plan, and prioritize appropriate responses to erosion in Alaska. With a effort of this magnitude, significant focus was given to identify communities that have erosion issues, determine how best to assess the problems within the limits of available funding, and how best to disseminate the information gathered such that local, State, Tribal, and Federal stakeholders will have a useful tool at their disposal. This website, along with the Alaska Baseline Erosion Assessment Technical Report, document the findings of the study and will provide local, State, Federal, and Tribal stakeholders information on how best to proceed with their particular erosion issues.
    www.poa.usace.army.mil/AKE/Home.html

  • Audio: Climate Change in Alaska - in their own words: Interviews with Alaska Native Elders (US Fish and Wildlife Service)
    Alaska’s Native people live in an intimate relationship with the land, share traditional knowledge spanning centuries, and are experiencing the effects of climate change directly and severely. The cultural identity of Alaska Natives and rural residents is closely tied to their environment and subsistence harvest continues to provide a large portion of the food consumed in many of Alaska’s communities. This subsistence lifestyle is dependent upon the continued health of Alaska’s ecosystems and natural communities. Important subsistence resources include marine mammals, caribou, fish, waterfowl, and moose, and climate change is already affecting access to some of these species. Click on map to hear about some of the climate-related changes to culture and lifestyle already being experienced by Alaska's Native community.
    http://alaska.fws.gov/climate/interview.htm

  • Video: Alaska: Faces of Climate Change - Three Part Video Documentary
    Three short videos showcasing the dramatic changes in Alaska's marine ecosystems through interviews with scientists and Alaska Natives. Produced by the Alaska Sea Grant program, the Alaska Marine Conservation Council, COSEE Alaska, and the Alaska Ocean Observing System. ©2011 Vimeo, LLC.
    http://vimeo.com/19581877

  • Audio: Evon Peter: Global Warming Impact on G'witchin People
    Interview about impacts on G’witichin Nation. 2009 © News From Indian Country.
    http://indiancountrynews.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6288

  • For Alaska's Inupiat, Climate Change and Culture Shock
    Discovery Channel article about impacts on Inupiat. April14, 2009.
    http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/04/13/inupiat-alaska-climate.html

  • Video: Tangible Effects of Climate Change
    Alaska Native talks about the effects of climate change on her villagers' traditional way of life.
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=7HrP5i0aKkc

  • Video: Losing Ground--Shishmaref, Alaska
    Interviews with residents of Shishmaref about impacts of climate change.
    Part 1 http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=2tVg4DUZw4o
    Part 2 http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=1wc-FnV4jn0&NR=1
    Part 3 http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=_uTyon_kXtI&feature=related

  • Video: The Inupiat People of Barrow
    Impacts of climate change on Inupiat people of Barrow.
    http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=r-6E50Mgi4c

  • Video: Alaskan Native thoughts on climate change
    Comments by resident of Native Village of Savoonga on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.
    http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=u5DiHp76gjs

  • Video: Climate Change in Unalakleet, Alaska
    Climate change impacts observed by elders in the Native Village of Unalakleet, Alaska.
    http://nl.youtube.com/watch?v=hHgNzal58kg

  • Audio: Young Alaskan Sees Changing Way of Life (NPR-Climate Connections)
    Climate change impact on Alaskan village.
    www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89755688

  • Video: Through Arctic Eyes (Arctic Athabaskan Council)
    Athabaskan observations of climate change.
    http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-1518502994444380318

  • Video: Inuit Observations on Climate Change (International Institute for Sustainable Development)
    Impacts of climate change from perspective of Inuvialuit hunters and trappers on Banks Island in Canada's High Arctic, 2000. 42 min.
    www.iisd.org/casl/projects/inuitobs.htm

  • AMAP 2009 Update on Selected Issues of Concern (Arctic Mapping and Assessment Program)
    Report includes summary of recent observations of changing climate, review of short-term climate forcers, new evaluation of Arctic carbon cycle, and new initiatives for improving predicitive capacity for Arctic region. April 2009.
    AMAP Climate Update 2009

  • Arctic Climate Impact Assessment Public Education and Outreach Center
    This website provides information about the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment of 2004.
    www.taiga.net/acia/index.html

  • Arctic Climate Impact Assessment
    International project of the Arctic Council and the International Arctic Science Committee to evaluate and synthesize knowledge on climate variability, climate change, and increased ultraviolet radiation and their consequences. 2004.
    www.acia.uaf.edu/

  • Book: The Earth is Faster Now:
    Indigenous Observations of Arctic Environmental Change, Krupnik, Igor, and Jolly, Dyanna (eds.), 2002. Fairbanks, Alaska: Arctic Research Consortium of the United States. 384 pp.

  • Climate Change Impacts on Traditional Foods and Medicines Report (Centre for Indigenous Environmental Resources)
    Report on current and predicted effects of climate change on traditional foods and medicines used by Black River First Nation (Canada), plus recommendations on how BRFN can adapt. April 2007
    www.cier.ca/information-and-resources/publications-and-products.aspx?id=1292



Hawaii and Pacific Islands    [Top]


  • Hawai'i's Changing Climate Briefing Sheet, 2010 (Center for Island Climate Adaptation and Policy, Univ. of Hawai'i)
    How is global warming influencing the climate in Hawai'i? The purpose of this briefing sheet is to describe what is known in answer to this question as published in peer-reviewed scientific journals and in government reports and websites. Hawai'i's climate is changing in ways that are consistent with the influence of global warming. 2010.
    http://web.me.com/icap1/Island_Climate/Publications_files/Fletcher_2010_HawaiisChangingClimate.pdf



Pacific Northwest    [Top]
  • Sauk-Suiattle Tribe looks at effects of sediment on spawning habitat
    The Sauk-Suiattle Tribe is working with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to study sediment on the Sauk, Suiattle and White Chuck rivers. Sediment is a concern in this watershed because the rivers pass through a network of forest roads and culverts that can fail and cause landslides. The glacier-fed rivers already have a naturally high amount of sediment, but silt from glacier melt is suspected to increase unnaturally because of human-caused climate change. Copyright © 2012 Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. 3/1/12.
    http://nwifc.org/2012/03/sauk-suiattle-tribe-looks-at-effects-of-sediment-on-spawning-habitat/

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to Western Mountains and Forests (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2009/090. February 2009.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Western Mountains and Forests

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Northwest (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Northwest

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts

  • Proclamation: A Swinomish Climate Change Initiative (Swinomish Indian Senate, Oct 2007)
    www.swinomish-nsn.gov/climate_change/Docs/Swinomish%20Climate%20Change%20Proclamation.pdf

  • Swinomish Climate Change Initiative: Impact Assessment Technical Report (Swinomish Indian Tribal Community)
    Climate change impact assessment, vulnerability assessment, and risk analysis by the Swinomish Tribal Indian Community. Oct. 2009.
    www.swinomish-nsn.gov/climate_change/Docs/SITC_CC_ImpactAssessmentTechnicalReport_complete.pdf

  • Northwest Tribes See Changes In Sacred 'First Foods'
    Article about impacts of climate change on traditional food sources in the Pacific Northwest. © 2011, Oregon Public Broadcasting, 7/28/11.
    http://news.opb.org /article/ northwest- tribes-see- changes-sacred- first-foods/

  • Climate Change, Fish and Tribes
    Speech given by Steve Robinson, Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission, at ITEP’s Climate Change Adaptation Planning course in Ocean Shores, WA. May 2010. *
    Climate Change, Fish and Tribes

  • Scientists: Acidity in Much of the Sound Can Be Lethal
    Seattle Post-Intelligence article about increasing acidity in parts of Puget Sound, making it lethal to shellfish larvae. Increasing ocean acidity will have an impact on tribes such as the Quileute Tribe which depends on shellfish and salmon. Much of the acidification is the result of the ocean absorbing increased carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. ©1996-2010 Hearst Seattle Media, LLC, 7/12/10. *
    www.seattlepi.com/local/423250_sound12.html?source=mypi

  • Constant Flooding Forces Out Pacific Northwest Tribe
    CNN Article about the plight of the Hoh Tribe on the coast of Washington and the tribe’s need to move to higher ground. Includes a video. April 23, 2010
    http://edition.cnn.com/2010/US/04/21/hoh.reservation.flooding/

  • Press Release: Swinomish Tribe Releases Report on Local Climate Change Impacts
    Press release about 140-page Impact Assessment Technical Report on potential impacts of climate change on Swinomish Indian Tribal Community, based on comprehensive review and analysis of current climate models and scientific data. 12/1/09.
    Press Release: Swinomish Tribe Releases Report on Local Climate Change Impacts
    Report available at Swinomish Climate Change Initiative:
    www.swinomish-nsn.gov/climate_change/climate_main.html

  • Climate Impacts Group
    Interdisciplinary research group studying impacts on Pacific Northwest.
    www.cses.washington.edu/cig/

  • Impacts of Climate Variability and Climate Change on Transportation Systems and Infrastructure in the Pacific Northwest (Climate Impacts Group, Univ. of Washington)
    White paper written by the Climate Impacts Group for the Western Federal Lands Highway Division of the Federal Highway Administration examines the impacts of climate variability and change on Pacific Northwest transportation systems and infrastructure. 7/5/11.
    http://cses.washington.edu/cig/outreach/newsletterfiles/hamlettransportation.pdf

  • Hydrologic Climate Change Scenarios for the Pacific Northwest Columbia River Basin and Coastal Drainages (Climate Impacts Group)
    The Climate Impacts Group worked with several prominent water management agencies in the Pacific Northwest to develop hydrologic climate change scenarios for approximately 300 streamflow locations in the Columbia River basin and selected coastal drainages west of the Cascades. The scenarios, provided to the public for free via their website, allow planners to consider how hydrologic changes may affect water resources management objectives and ecosystems. Access to the data and summary products is provided on the website. The hydrologic data produced by the study are based on climate change scenarios produced for the IPCC Fourth Assessment effort. Information on the methods and modeling tools used in the study is provided in the summary report. For new users of the site, a guide to the website and the data resources contained within it is also provided. *
    www.hydro.washington.edu/2860/

  • Climate Impacts in Brief (Climate Impacts Group)
    Provides a comprehensive but brief overview of the impacts of climate variability and change on the Pacific Northwest. *
    http://cses.washington.edu/cig/pnwc/ci.shtml#anchor1

  • Climate Change in Washington State (Dept. of Ecology, State of Washington)
    Website includes information on climate change impacts in Washington, state policies, climate education resources, and more.*
    www.ecy.wa.gov/climatechange/index.htm

  • Climate Change in Oregon (Oregon Dept. of Energy)
    Website includes downloadable reports on climate change in Oregon. *
    www.orclimatechange.gov/ENERGY/GBLWRM/Portal.shtml

  • Oregon Climate Assessment Report (Oregon Climate Change Research Institute–Oregon State Univ.)
    In 2007, the Oregon State Legislature charged the Oregon Climate Change Research Institute with assessing the state of climate change science including biological, physical and social science as it relates to Oregon and the likely effects of climate change on the state. This inaugural assessment report is meant to act as a compendium of the relevant research on climate change and its impacts on the state of Oregon. December 2010 *
    http://occri.net/ocar

  • Climate Change Resources (Northwest Indian Applied Research Institute, Evergreen State College)
    Website has links to many global, national and Pacific Northwest climate change resources. *
    http://nwindian.evergreen.edu/resourcesulin.htm

  • A GIS Analysis of Climate Change and Snowpack on Columbia Basin Tribal Lands
    Journal article by David Graves (Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commis¬sion). Ecological Restoration, 27(3):256-257 (2009). *
    www.critfc.org/tech/climate/Graves_ER27-3_pp256-257.pdf

  • Climate Change Impacts on Tribal Resources
    Flyer about impacts on Tulalip Tribe, WA.
    www.tulalip.nsn.us/pdf.docs/FINAL%20CC%20FLYER.pdf

  • Climate Change in the Northwest: Tribal Perspectives (US Fish and Wildlife Service)
    Website has powerpoint presentations given at conference hosted by Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, May 2008.
    www.fws.gov/pacific/Climatechange/meetings/tribalworkshop.html

  • NW coastal nations at risk of climate change disruptions
    Article in News From Indian Country, Jan. 8, 2009.
    2009 © News From Indian Country
    http://indiancountrynews.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=3080&Itemid=5

  • Developing a Northwest Tribal Climate Change Strategy Workshop
    Conference presentations from a workshop hosted by Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority in 2008. Includes presentations about impacts of climate change in the Pacific Northwest. *
    www.critfc.org/tech/climate/cc_workshop.html

  • Sea-level Rise and Coastal Habitats in the Pacific Northwest--An Analysis for Puget Sound, Southwestern Washington, and Northwestern Oregon (National Wildlife Federation)
    Report includes maps showing which areas will be affected when global warming causes sea level rise. In some cases, sea water will cover the land where it does not today. In other cases, wildlife will be affected either because of changes in the way water flows or salinity levels. July 2007.
    Pacific NW Sea Level Rise



Southwest and Great Basin    [Top]
  • Navajo Memory Complements Science in Study of Climate Change
    The sand dunes among which Navajos have eked out austere livings for generations are growing fast and becoming mobile as the climate changes, says U.S. Geological Survey geologist Dr. Margaret Hiza Redsteer, whose interviews with elders and historical research augment her decade-long research on Navajo Nation land. USGS Press Pelease, 10/21/11.
    www.usgs.gov/newsroom/article.asp?ID=3007

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to Arid Lands (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2010/209. June 2010.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Arid Lands

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Southwest (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Southwest

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts

  • Climate: Sand dunes on the move in Navajo Nation
    With a persistent drought gripping parts of the Southwest since 1996, researchers have documented noticeable changes in the sand dunes where Navajos have eked out an austere living for generations. The dunes are growing fast and starting to move as the regional climate changes, according U.S. Geological Survey geologist Dr. Margaret Hiza Redsteer, whose interviews with elders and historical research augment her decade-long research on Navajo Nation land. Summit County Citizens Voice, 10/24/11.
    http://summitcountyvoice.com/2011/10/24/climate-sand-dunes-on-the-move-in-navajo-nation/

  • Drought Preparedness for Tribes in the Four Corners Workshop Report (Climate Assessment for the Southwest, University of Arizona)
    The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)—in collaboration with the US Geological Survey (USGS) Flagstaff Science Center, the National Drought Mitigation Center (NDMC), and the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS)—hosted 1.5 day workshop in Flagstaff, Arizona, on April 8-9, 2010, to explore opportunities for developing a drought early warning system for the Four Corners region of the U.S. Southwest. The workshop report lays out the key issues discussed at the workshop, provides some basic context and information about the climate and drivers of drought in the region, and looks toward potential next steps for developing an effective drought early warning system for the Four Corners region.
    www.climas.arizona.edu/projects/2010-four-corners-tribal-workshop

  • Video: The Forest for the Trees
    In Arizona, trees are cut down to save forests from massive fires and to combat climate change. © 2011 The New York Times Company.
    http://video.nytimes.com/video/2011/10/01/science/100000001071584/the-forest-for-the-trees.html?nl=todaysheadlines&emc=thab1

  • Between a Rock and a Dry Place: The Impact of Oil Shale Development and Climate Change on the Colorado River Basin Water Supply (Natural Resources Defense Council)
    With growing interest in oil shale development in the upper Colorado River Basin, the already arid West faces threats of increased demand on its already limited water resources. Processing oil shale requires significant amounts of water -- on average, an estimated three to five barrels for each barrel of oil produced. This loss in water supply would create unprecedented challenges for cities and communities throughout the West. This report explores some of the possible implications of committing a relatively modest but critical portion of the Colorado River Basin’s limited and highly coveted water supply to develop potential sources of energy that would be economically and environmentally costly. © Natural Resources Defense Council 2011. August 2011.
    www.nrdc.org/water/rockanddryplace.asp

  • Checking the Range for Signs of Climate Change: In the Past, Present and Future (USDA Forest Service)
    The Rocky Mountain Research Station Grassland, Shrubland and Desert Ecosystem Science Program (GSD) has prepared a periodic research review directed toward cooperators, colleagues, and stakeholders. This inaugural issue of the GSD Update takes a look at research in one of their five focal areas: climate change. July 2011.
    GSD Update July 2011

  • Climate, Drought and Early Warning on Western Native Lands
    NIDIS workshop held in Jackson, WY, in 2009, focused on climate change and drought on Western native lands.
    www.drought.gov/portal/server.pt/community/drought.gov/tribal_workshop

  • AZ DroughtWatch: Arizona’s Drought Impact Reporting System
    AZ DroughtWatch is a tool designed to collect qualitative reports of drought impacts across Arizona. This impact information is used in conjunction with meteorological and hydrological data to characterize drought conditions.
    http://azdroughtwatch.org/faces/jsp/index.jsp

  • Cal-Adapt (Univ. Of California Berkeley’s Geospatial Innovation Facility)
    Website provides access to the wealth of data and information that has been, and continues to be, produced by California’s scientific and research community. The data available on the website offer a view of how climate change might change California at the local level. Includes local climate snapshots, interactive maps and charts, access to raw data, and more.
    http://cal-adapt.org/

  • USDA Designates Reservation in Arizona as Disaster Area
    As a result of major losses caused by drought, high winds, excessive heat and wildfires that began this year, the US Dept. of Agriculture has designated the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona as a primary natural disaster area. © 2011 Indian Country Today Media Network, LLC, 7/21/11.
    http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/07/usda-designates-reservation-in-arizona-as-disaster-area/

  • Southwestern Wildfires: The Big Picture
    Overview of the wildfires that have been impacting Arizona and New Mexico, including tribal lands, during the summer of 2011. © 2011 Indian Country Today Media Network, LLC, 7/20/11.
    http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/07/southwestern-wildfires-the-big-picture/

  • Wallow Fire: Tribe Credits Winds, Prayer, Prevention for Dodging Fire
    The White Mountain Apache Tribe seems to have dodged the Wallow Fire in Arizona less than a decade after they suffered the wrath of Rodeo-Chediski fire. © 2011 azcentral.com, 6/12/11.
    www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/06/12/20110612wallow-fire-tribe-credits-winds-prayer-dodging-fire.html#ixzz1Q1IAYBAL

  • Managing Changing Landscapes in the Southwestern United States (Southwest Climate Change Initiative of the Nature Conservancy)
    This regional assessment examines the impacts of temperature change from 1951-2006 on natural resources in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah. It documents that warming has already affected habitats, watersheds, and species in the Southwest, by influencing the timing of seasonal events or amplifying the impacts of natural disturbances such as wildfire and drought. The report concludes that to begin adapting to climate change, natural resource managers should reevaluate the effectiveness of current restoration tools, modify resource objectives, learn from climate-smart adaptive management and monitoring, and share information across boundaries. January 2011.
    http://nmconservation.org/downloads/data/managing_changing_landscapes_in_the_southwestern_united_states/

  • Assessing the Future of Wyoming's Water Resources: Adding Climate Change to the Equation
    Report written for broad audience on climate change impacts to Wyoming’s water resources. University of Wyoming, 2009.
    www.uwyo.edu/enrsupport/projects/UofW-Water_Climate_final_comp.pdf

  • Southwest Climate Change Network (Univ. of Arizona)
    Virtual network for sharing information on climate change in Southwest and collaborate on solutions.
    www.southwestclimatechange.org

  • Climate Choices in California (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    www.climatechoices.org/ca/index.html

  • Hotter and Drier: The West's Changed Climate (Rocky Mountain Climate Organization, Natural Resources Defense Council)
    Report documents that the West is being affected more by a changed climate than any other part of the United States outside of Alaska.
    www.nrdc.org/globalWarming/west/contents.asp

  • Presentation: Climate Change in the Southwest: Santa Clara Pueblo, the Rio Grande, and the Imminent Regional Impacts
    Presentation given at the 2008 National Tribal Forum about the impacts of climate change on the Santa Clara Pueblo in New Mexico.
    Presentation

  • Audio: Drought Threatens Navajo's Crops, Culture (NPR Climate Connections)
    5-minute audio story. July 2007
    www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=11992971

  • USGS Navajo Land Use Planning Project (U.S. Geological Survey)
    Impacts on land, vegetation, water resources of Navajo Nation.
    http://geomaps.wr.usgs.gov/navajo/

  • Disaster Risk Assessment Case Study: Recent Drought on the Navajo Nation, southwestern United States
    Scant long-term meteorological records and historical documentation were complemented with observations by Navajo elders on changes in water availability, weather, and sand or dust storms. A long-term drying trend and decreasing snowpack, superimposed on regional drought cycles, will magnify drought impacts on the Navajo Nation and leave its people increasingly vulnerable. United Nations 2011 Global Assessment Report on Disaster Risk Reduction, May 2011.
    Navajo Nation Case Study

  • Presentation: Climate Change Impacts on the Navajo Nation, and other Native Lands
    Presentation given by Margaret Hiza Redsteer (USGS) at ITEP's Climate Change course, August 2008.
    Presentation

  • Audio: Sand Dunes on the Loose Due to Climate Change (USGS)
    Podcast interview with USGS scientist Margaret Hiza and intern Leanna Begay on their research to understand the dunes' plant diversity and what changes are occurring on the Navajo Nation. May 2009.
    http://gallery.usgs.gov/audios/268



Prairies and High Plains    [Top]
  • CSKT launches comprehensive climate-change study
    To better understand what warming temperatures mean to the future of forestry, water management and wildlife on the Flathead Reservation, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes' Forestry Department is launching a groundbreaking pilot project to evaluate the future impacts of a climate in transition, aided by the U.S. Forest Service and Britain's University of Leeds. 3/1/12.
    http://missoulanews.bigskypress.com/missoula/cskt-launches-comprehensive-climate-change-study/Content?oid=1538858

  • Oklahoma Inter-Tribal Meeting on Climate Variability and Change: Meeting Summary Report
    On December 12, 2011, representatives of 22 tribal nations and 3 tribal colleges met at the National Weather Center in Norman, Okla. to learn about climate variability and change and develop recommendations to be included in the 2013 National Climate Assessment document. The report provides information on the impact of climate change and variability on tribal sectors and cultures, as well as long term recommendations on the resources and information needed by tribal nations in Oklahoma and Texas to implement climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies. 2012.
    www.southernclimate.org/publications/Oklahoma_Intertribal_Climate_Change_Meeting.pdf

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to Prairie Potholes and Grasslands (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2009/138. December 2009.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Prairie Potholes and Grasslands

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Great Plains (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Great Plains

  • Crow Reservation Flood Leaves Families Homeless
    Flooding in southeastern Montana has devastated at least 50 homes on the Crow Reservation, which is located south of Billings, MT. The flood spread quickly, flooding homes and buildings and washing out roads and bridges. Crow Tribal response teams, along with BIA and other government agencies, evacuated residents to temporary shelters in Hardin and Billings. When allowed to return, many residents found their homes a total loss. Donations are desperately needed; any level of donation is valuable in sustaining and rebuilding the community and families of the Crow Community. For more information:
    Press Release

  • US: Indigenous Lakota Women Face Harsh Winter Wrath Under Climate Change
    Women News Network article discusses the vulnerability of Oglala Sioux Lakota Elder women and their families, suffering from severe poverty, to the impacts of the upcoming harsh winter season forecasted by NOAA. ©2010 Women News Network – WNN, 11/2/10.
    http://womennewsnetwork.net/2010/11/02/lakotaelderwomen-1008/

  • Preparing for a Changing Climate: Central Great Plains
    Central Great Plains Climate Change Impacts Assessment, July 2002.
    www.nrel.colostate.edu/projects/gpa/gpa_report.pdf



Great Lakes Region    [Top]
  • True Wild Rice Probably Isn't What You Think It Is-It's Better
    Article about wild rice and concerns about the impacts of climate change on wild rice. © 2011 Indian Country Today Media Network, LLC, 11/1/11.
    http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2011/11/true-wild-rice-probably-isnt-what-you-think-it-is%E2%80%94its-better/

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to the Great Lakes (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/CCRP/NRR—2010/247. September 2010.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Great Lakes

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Midwest (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Midwest

  • Where Food Grows on Water: Environmental and Human Threats to Wisconsin’s Wild Rice
    Article about the Bad River’s wild rice in Wisconsin, which is a food source for the Anishinaabe people, and the environmental and human threats, including climate change, to the rice beds. © 2011 Circle of Blue, 8/4/11.
    www.circleofblue.org/waternews/2011/world/where-food-grows-on-water-environmental-and-human-made-threats-to-wisconsins-wild-rice/

  • Wisconsin’s Changing Climate: Impacts and Adaptation (The Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts)
    This report is intended as a resource for business executives, government, natural resource managers, public health officials and other decision makers as they take strategic steps to preserve jobs, invest resources wisely, build resiliency and protect our built and natural environment in the face of a changing climate.
    www.wicci.wisc.edu/publications.php

  • Climate Wisconsin: Stories from a State of Change
    Climate Wisconsin is an educational multimedia project featuring stories of climate change. The stories from across Wisconsin were documented over ten months beginning in February, 2010. The stories were produced to support teaching and learning about climate change in Wisconsin, and teaching tips are provided. The section on Forestry focuses on the forests of the Menominee Nation. © 2011 Wisconsin Educational Communications Board.
    http://climatewisconsin.org/

  • Lake Superior, a Huge Natural Climate Change Gauge, Is Running a Fever
    New York Times article about how Lake Superior is changing in response to climate change, and how these changes may threaten practices important to tribes in the area, such as wild rice farming. Copyright 2010 E&E Publishing. 7/19/10.
    www.nytimes.com/cwire/2010/07/19/19climatewire-lake-superior-a-huge-natural-climate-change-83371.html

  • Minnesota’s Moose: Ghosts of the Northern Forest?
    Article about declining moose population in Minnesota. BioScience 59(10): 824-828. Nov. 2009.
    www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.1525/bio.2009.59.10.3

  • Confronting Climate Change in the US Midwest (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    Series of reports by Union of Concerned Scientists and leading climate scientists provides an in-depth look at the potential consequences of climate change in the US Midwest. 2009.
    www.ucsusa.org/global_warming/science_and_impacts/impacts/climate-change-midwest.html

  • Migrating Climates (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    www.ucsusa.org/greatlakes/glimpactmigrating.html

  • Presentation: Moose Health and Climate Change
    Presentation given by Mike Schrage (Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa) at Great Lakes Tribal Climate Change Symposium, Dec. 2008.
    Presentation



Northeast    [Top]
  • Maine's Climate Future Report (University of Maine)
    Report considers past change over geologic time, recent evidence of accelerated rates of change, and the implications of continued climate change in Maine during the 21st century as a result of greenhouse gas emissions and their associated pollutants. Includes a section on indigenous peoples (p. 37-40). February 2009.
    http://climatechange.umaine.edu/research/publications/climate-future

  • Indicators of Climate Change in the Northeast 2005 (Clean Air-Cool Planet)
    Report provides overview of climate change indicators in Northeast, including changes in precipitation, temperature, growing seasons, and sea level. Copyright 2005 © Clean Air - Cool Planet
    Indicators of Climate Change in the Northeast 2005

  • Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region (US Climate Change Science Program)
    Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.1. Detailed assessment of effects of sea-level rise on coastal environments; presents some of the challenges that need to be addressed in order to adapt to sea-level rise while protecting environmental resources and sustaining economic growth. January 2009.
    Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region

  • Confronting Climate Change in the U.S. Northeast (Northeast Climate Impacts Assessment-NECIA)
    Report from NECIA, which is a collaborative effort between the Union of Concerned Scientists and a team of independent experts to assess how global warming will affect the northeastern United States following two different paths: a higher-emissions path with continued rapid growth in global warming pollution, and a lower-emissions path with greatly reduced heat-trapping emissions. July 2007.
    www.climatechoices.org/assets/documents/climatechoices/confronting-climate-change-in-the-u-s-northeast.pdf

  • Climate Choices in the Northeast (Union of Concerned Scientists)
    www.climatechoices.org/ne/index.html

  • Presentation: Climate Change Impacts on Eastern Tribes
    Presentation given by Steve Crawford (Passamaqouddy Tribe) at National Tribal Forum conference, June 2008.
    Presentation



Eastern Woodlands and the Gulf Coast    [Top]
  • Southeast Florida's Resilient Water Resources (Florida Atlantic University)
    This study indicates that climate change will cause significant impacts on Southeast Florida's water infrastructure, attributable to sea level rise and growing variation in seasonal rainfall patterns with more intense periods of drought alternating with increased torrential rainfall events. The report exemplified that as a consequence of climate change impacts, Southeast Florida water utilities will face a number of challenges, including inundation of low-lying coastal areas; saltwater contamination of well fields; malfunction of septic tanks and drainage systems; reduction in soil capacity to store rainfall; and reduced efficiency of stormwater drainage canals and flood gates, among others. Strategies to manage these challenges would require substantial economic investments as well as the increase of household utility bills to support these improvements.
    www.ces.fau.edu/projects/climate_change

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to the Atlantic Coast (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2009/095. December 2009.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Atlantic Coast

  • Understanding the Science of Climate Change: Talking Points – Impacts to the Gulf Coast (US Dept of Interior)
    This document is part of a series of bio-regional summaries that provide key scientific findings about climate change and impacts to protected areas. The information is intended to provide a basic understanding of the science of climate change, known and expected impacts to resources and visitor experience, and actions that can be taken to mitigate and adapt to change. Natural Resource Report NPS/NRPC/NRR—2010/210. June 2010.
    Talking Points – Impacts to Gulf Coast

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Northeast (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Northeast

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Southeast (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Southeast

  • Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts (US Global Change Research Program)
    Chapter from the National Climate Assessment report, "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." 2009.
    Regional Climate Change Impacts—Coasts

  • Sea level Changes in the Southeastern United States: Past, Present, and Future (Florida Climate Institute and the Southeast Climate Consortium)
    Report is aimed at nonscientists and scientists who are not specialists in sea level change. It provides an introduction to the issue and suggests that the region should plan for an increase of about 80 centimeters of global sea level rise by 2100. August 2011.
    http://coaps.fsu.edu/~mhannion/201108mitchum_sealevel.pdf

  • Louisiana Indian Village Holds Out Against Plea to Move
    Article about impacts of rising sea level and resistance of residents to relocating. 2009 © News From Indian Country, December 16, 2009.
    http://indiancountrynews.net/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=8061&Itemid=1

  • Audio: Native Americans Lose Land to Climate Change (The Environment Report)
    Interview with Chief Albert Naquin, July 2009.
    www.environmentreport.org/story.php?story_id=4582

  • Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region (US Climate Change Science Program)
    Synthesis and Assessment Product 4.1. Detailed assessment of effects of sea-level rise on coastal environments; presents some of the challenges that need to be addressed in order to adapt to sea-level rise while protecting environmental resources and sustaining economic growth. January 2009.
    Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region

  • Confronting Climate Change in the Gulf Coast Region: Prospects for Sustaining Our Ecological Heritage (Union of Concerned Scientists and the Ecological Society of America)
    www.ucsusa.org/gulf/gcchallengereport.html

                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
* This item was added to the website with support from the US Forest Service and Sustainable Northwest.




©2002 Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals & Northern Arizona University
Last updated: April 16, 2012